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Need a new Neutrino Theory

  1. Apr 17, 2007 #1
    Well, the verdict is in: MiniBOONE fails to
    confirm the e-flavor neutrino appearance once
    claimed on the basis of the LSND experiment.

    There now is NO evidence of appearance of a new
    neutrino flavor as a function of anything, including
    distance of neutrino propagation.

    Hopefully, this will revitalize efforts to come up
    with a new and better theory.

    The current oscillation theory is based on
    a group theory of multiple neutrino mass eigenstates
    and implies violation of conservation of energy or
    momentum, or both, in a freely propagating particle.
    Physicists have been willing to trade off these
    conservation laws for too long.

    All we know now, from K2K and similar experiments, is
    that neutrinos of a certain flavor at the creation point
    are detected with less probability at long distances
    than at short. This is called a "disappearance"
    phenomenon and is well supported by the evidence.

    It can't be mass eigenstate oscillation, if we want our
    precious energy and momentum laws. These laws work well
    in all the rest of physics, including particle interactions.
    Why drop them just to fiddle with some group math?

    Is flavor a (proper) time dependent property?
    Is it distance dependent?

    Can an interaction cross-section depend on proper time
    or distance?

    Does flavor decay? Do neutrinos decay?

    Does anyone have a good idea which is consistent with
    known physical laws?
     
  2. jcsd
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