Need help identifying a beetle

  • Thread starter Fervent Freyja
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In summary, This beetle was found in an aerospace facility in the southeastern US. It was identified as an eastern Hercules beetle.
  • #1
Fervent Freyja
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TL;DR Summary
Insect identification
Need help identifying this beetle I found a few days ago. I gave it to my nephew today as a pet, but my sister wants to kill it (she think’s that it’s a dung beetle). Also need to know what he needs to be feeding it! I threw in some tomato/lettuce, sticks and plants, but not sure what it needs!

It’s about 3” long. It didn’t move and hid under a leaf the first day I had it- I was pretty sure it was going to die. But last night it was making LOUD thumping noises and slamming itself so hard into the lid that it was shaking the container! This was as close as a shot as I was comfortable getting

Does this look familiar to anyone?
F08DF4BB-D1E7-46B6-AD50-F662A60D597B.jpeg
 
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  • #2
Yeah, looks like a beetle, (however, there are a lot of them).

I tried a google image search, but it didn't find any good matches because the front of the head was lacking.
Pictures of that would help.
Scale would be good (picture with a ruler).
Also, where found (area of country), kind of environment (niche) would be useful in narrowing down to what it is.

It does not look like a dung beetle to me (just saw a documentary on them). They seem chunkier to me.

There are often regional guides to insects in an area.
Extension services might have these, but searches should be able to find them.
 
  • #3
I'm no entomologist, but it would probably be useful to know at least the rough geograhical area it was found in.
 
  • #4
It will also help to give the tarsal formula (it's on Wikipedia if you need to look it up) for the beetle.
 
  • #5
Vanadium 50 said:
I'm no entomologist, but it would probably be useful to know at least the rough geograhical area it was found in.

Oh, the geographical area is southeastern US, but since it was found in an aerospace facility and the guys that tried to scare me with it work on the floor, I only assumed it could have come from overseas/nationwide too. I don't really know exactly where they found it, but was thinking it likely come from a shipment seeing how it was almost dead or in some kind of diapause state?

i don’t know, it says the tarsal formula for beetles is usually 5-5-5.

BillTre said:
Pictures of that would help.
Scale would be good (picture with a ruler).

I’ll see if he can get some better pictures!

Thanks!
 
  • #6
Fervent Freyja said:
Oh, the geographical area is southeastern US, but since it was found in an aerospace facility and the guys that tried to scare me with it work on the floor, I only assumed it could have come from overseas/nationwide too. I don't really know exactly where they found it, but was thinking it likely come from a shipment seeing how it was almost dead or in some kind of diapause state?
I would look to local fauna first since they are the most likely suspects.
You wold be surprised how many different kinds of insects are around you that you probably completely unaware of.

Pictures.
Beetles (and kin) of the Southeastern US. Report your beetle here.
North American Beetles (ID guide).
 
  • #7
BillTre said:
I would look to local fauna first since they are the most likely suspects.
You wold be surprised how many different kinds of insects are around you that you probably completely unaware of.

You were right, it’s native! They found out it’s an eastern Hercules beetle. Thanks! ❤️
 
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1. How can I identify a beetle?

To identify a beetle, you can start by looking at its physical characteristics such as its size, color, and shape. You can also use a field guide or online resources to help you narrow down the species. If you're still unsure, you can consult with a local entomologist or insect expert.

2. What are some common types of beetles?

Some common types of beetles include ladybugs, scarab beetles, ground beetles, and longhorn beetles. Other well-known beetles include fireflies, weevils, and dung beetles.

3. What is the difference between a beetle and a bug?

Beetles and bugs are both types of insects, but they belong to different orders. Beetles belong to the order Coleoptera, while bugs belong to the order Hemiptera. Beetles have hard, shell-like wings, while bugs have thin, membranous wings. Beetles also have chewing mouthparts, while bugs have sucking mouthparts.

4. Are beetles harmful to humans?

Most beetles are not harmful to humans. In fact, many beetles are beneficial as they help with pollination and control other insect populations. However, some species of beetles can cause damage to crops and plants, and a few can even transmit diseases.

5. What should I do if I find a beetle in my house?

If you find a beetle in your house, the best thing to do is to safely remove it and release it back into the wild. Most beetles are not harmful and are simply looking for shelter or food. If you have a large infestation of beetles in your home, you may need to consult with a pest control professional for assistance.

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