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Need help please. Charged ions

  1. Sep 14, 2010 #1
    My coursework is ruined, but im not asking for help with my coursework.

    Does anyone know if there is a ion with a charge of +4. I might not be making sense. I know about Copper Chloride (CuCl+2) and Silver Nitrate (AgNO3+1) and Iron III Chloride (FeCl+3). Does anyone know of a plus 4?

    I think its to do with oxidisation states of metals?

    Much appreciated, Adam
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 14, 2010 #2

    Borek

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    Several that I can think off. Just looking at periodic table you should be able to guess at least some of them.
     
  4. Sep 14, 2010 #3
    i have noted a few down, e.g Pb, NH, Ti, they need to be solouble in water. Is there a way of telling form the periodic table what elements can be 4+? is that to do with groups or rows? thankyou

    edit : ignore NH, its not metallic
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2010
  5. Sep 14, 2010 #4

    Borek

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    Pb should be obvious - 4th group (look harder in the same group :wink:). When it comes to Ti it is a little bit more complicated, but when you look at its configuration - s2d2 - it is not that surprising that it can lost four electrons.
     
  6. Sep 14, 2010 #5
    sorry, im starting to get confused here. ive had a crap day learning my coursework is all wrong :L Isnt Tin Sn? but tin-tetra chloride has +4 charged chlorine atoms dosent it? im looking for a +4 solution where the cations are a metal. e.g copper or silver. Ive drawn a blank so far looking.

    I looked at lead but apparently it is near impossible to disolve in water.

    Do you know if there is any i can use? im getting stuck
     
  7. Sep 14, 2010 #6

    Borek

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    Tin(IV) chloride is a good idea, even if the solution probably doesn't contain Sn4+ cations - my guess is that in neutral or alkaline solution it will be present as some oxoanion, and in low pH it will be complexed by whatever anions will be present.

    Check Ce4+.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2013
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