Need help to show f(x)=x + cos x has an inverse w/out graph

In summary, the student is struggling to show that the function f(x)= x + cos x has an inverse without using a graph. They are seeking help to understand this concept and are worried about failing the class. The suggestion is made to think intuitively about the problem and consider the behavior of functions without graphing. It is also suggested to think about the relationship between derivatives and inverses, and to consider the use of the "vertical line test" for determining inverses.
  • #1
mmlm01
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I need to show that the function {f(x)= x + cos x} has an inverse without the use of a graph. The professor has asked us to think intuitively about this problem, and I am just at a loss. Any help would be most appreciated, as I am trying not to fail this class. Thanks!
 
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  • #2
mmlm01 said:
I need to show that the function {f(x)= x + cos x} has an inverse without the use of a graph. The professor has asked us to think intuitively about this problem, and I am just at a loss. Any help would be most appreciated, as I am trying not to fail this class. Thanks!
You can tell how a function behaves without drawing a graph. Think about this: y=x has an inverse and y=x3 has an inverse, but y=x2 and y=cos(x) don't have global inverses. Have you learned about derivatives ? What is true about the first two functions that isn't true about the second two functions ?
How could you get the graph of an inverse given the graph of a function ? What does the "vertical line test" mean ? What kind of test would you use for inverses ? How does this test connect with derivatives ?
 
  • #3

Related to Need help to show f(x)=x + cos x has an inverse w/out graph

What is the definition of an inverse function?

An inverse function is a function that performs the opposite operation of another function. In other words, if the original function takes an input x and produces an output y, the inverse function takes y as an input and produces x as an output.

How can I show that a function has an inverse without graphing?

There are a few different methods to show that a function has an inverse without graphing. One way is to use the horizontal line test, which states that if a horizontal line intersects the graph of the function at more than one point, then the function does not have an inverse. Another way is to use algebraic manipulation to solve for the inverse function.

Can you show me an example of using the horizontal line test to prove the existence of an inverse function?

Sure, let's take the function f(x) = x + 3 as an example. If we draw a horizontal line at y = 6, we can see that it intersects the graph of f(x) at two points, (3,6) and (4,6). This means that the function does not have an inverse. However, if we take the function g(x) = x - 3, the horizontal line at y = 6 only intersects the graph at one point, (9,6), showing that g(x) does have an inverse.

How can I algebraically solve for the inverse of a function?

The first step is to replace the function notation (f(x)) with y. Then, switch the x and y variables and solve for y. The resulting equation will be the inverse function. In the case of f(x) = x + cos x, we have y = x + cos x. Switching the x and y variables gives us x = y + cos y. Solving for y, we get the inverse function y = x - cos x.

Can a function have more than one inverse?

No, a function can only have one inverse. This is because for a function to have an inverse, it must pass the vertical line test, which states that a vertical line can only intersect the graph of a function at one point. If a function has more than one inverse, it would fail this test and therefore would not be considered a function.

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