Negative light speed

  • Thread starter renerob
  • Start date
  • #1
20
0
If e=mc^2, then (e/m)1/2= either +c or -c. What is the physical meaning of minus c?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Matterwave
Science Advisor
Gold Member
3,965
326
e=mc^2 shouldn't be used to try to find "c". "c" is a defined constant of 299792458 m/s.
 
  • #3
32
0
Mathematically -c exists, but this is a non-physical result, and is therefore ignored when using the e=mc2 equation. :)
 
  • #4
Nabeshin
Science Advisor
2,205
16
e=mc^2 shouldn't be used to try to find "c". "c" is a defined constant of 299792458 m/s.
Precisely. Imagine the equation like this:
[tex]E=m(2)^2[/tex]
[tex] 2=\pm \sqrt{\frac{E}{m}} [/tex]

Hope this clarifies.
 

Related Threads on Negative light speed

  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
8K
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
17
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
20
Views
19K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
863
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
802
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
3K
Top