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Nernst theorem

  1. Mar 15, 2012 #1
    Entropy is defined by:

    [tex]S(A)=\int^{T_A}_0C_V\frac{dT}{T}[/tex]

    where [tex]A[/tex] is state of the system in which temperature is [tex]T_A[/tex]. When [tex]T_A\rightarrow 0[/tex] and [tex]C_V[/tex] must go to zero. Why? And how fast does it go?
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 15, 2012 #2
    Your question is technically right but entropy is always increasing so it never be fall in zero.The 2nd law of thermodynamics says that (ds/dt)≥ 0. But may be in some special cases if externally keep the temperature very low depends on the state of the system its true and this is a very speedy process that is no interaction between the system and its surroundings so that the temperature is nearly= 0 and Cv falls into zero...
     
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