Net Charge on a Magnesium ion

In summary, the instructor is questioning the student's understanding of how the loss of two electrons in a magnesium ion translates into net charge in SI units. They expected a full answer with the appropriate sign and units. The student was reminded to be careful with the number of electrons lost and to provide a complete answer. The correct format should include the net charge and SI units.
  • #1

Homework Statement


Calculate the net charge on a magnesium ion which has lost two electrons.

2. The attempt at a solution
I put 2+ as my answer and this is what I was told, but I don't understand what they mean by the following;

That's a chemist's shorthand, not the amount of charge on the ion.
You did not give the correct unit.
Does the magnesium ion gain or lose charge when it loses electrons?
Be careful with the number of electrons lost!
The question asks for the charge, which should be given in SI units.
 
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  • #2
1. Often 2+ is shorthand notation for the amount of charge on an ion. You were expected to provide a full answer.
2. The full answer must show a number and the appropriate units. The symbol "+" is not an appropriate unit.
3. This comment does not make much sense to me. The question clearly states that the ion has lost electrons and since electrons carry charge, then the ion has lost charge.
4. I think this means that you didn't correctly translate the loss of two electrons to the creation of net charge on the ion.
5. This comment reinforces comment 2 in that the appropriate units must be SI units.

In summary, the instructor who provided these comments appears not to be convinced that you understand how the loss of two electrons in the ion can be translated into a number of SI charge units including the appropriate sign. The correct answer was expected to have the format
After the loss of two electrons, the net charge on the ion is _____ (+ or -) __________ (number other than 2) ________ (SI units).
Can you fill in the blanks?
 
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What is the net charge on a Magnesium ion?

The net charge on a Magnesium ion is +2. This means that the ion has two more protons than electrons, giving it a positive charge.

How does Magnesium become an ion?

Magnesium becomes an ion by losing two electrons. This can happen through a chemical reaction or by the ionization process.

Why does Magnesium have a +2 charge?

Magnesium has a +2 charge because it belongs to Group 2 on the periodic table, also known as the alkaline earth metals. These elements have two valence electrons, which are easily lost to form a stable ion with a +2 charge.

Can the net charge on a Magnesium ion change?

Yes, the net charge on a Magnesium ion can change if it gains or loses electrons. For example, if it gains two electrons, it will have a net charge of 0 and become a neutral atom again.

What is the significance of the net charge on a Magnesium ion?

The net charge on a Magnesium ion is significant because it determines the ion's chemical and physical properties. It also affects how the ion will interact with other ions and molecules in a chemical reaction.

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