Net gravitational force problem in a straight line?

  • #1
Question

In the figure attached, what is the magnitude of the net gravitational force exerted on the 0.100-kg uniform sphere by the other two uniform spheres? The centers of all three spheres are on the same line.

So, I'm thinking [tex]F_1=(Gm_1m_2/r_1^2)[/tex] and [tex]F_2=Gm_1m_3/r_2^2[/tex].

[tex]F_1=(6.673*10^-10)(.100)(10.0)/(.600^2)[/tex]
[tex]F_2=(6.673*10^-10)(.100)(5.00)/(.400^2)[/tex]

[tex]F_1=1.854*10^-10[/tex]
[tex]F_2=-2.085*10^-10[/tex]

[tex]F_x=F_1+F_2=-2.31*10^-11[/tex] N

I don't think there is a force in the y-direction, so [tex]F=\sqrt(F_x^2)=2.31*10^-11[/tex] N.

Is this correct?
 

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Answers and Replies

  • #2
Doc Al
Mentor
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Looks good to me. (You did have a few typos in some of your steps.)
 

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