B Never-ending experiments in MWI

  • Thread starter cube137
  • Start date
25,248
6,385
Let's say the energy or the Hamiltonian operator has 10 Gev defined for the entire quantum state. Does it mean each term (or branches) would have 5 Gev?
No.

How do the branches partition the energy?
They don't. You apply an operator to the quantum state, not to parts of it. So it's meaningless to ask what the energy of just one branch is.

what is the right unit for energy (instead of Gev)
You can use any energy units you like. GeV is a perfectly valid energy unit.
 
361
11
No.



They don't. You apply an operator to the quantum state, not to parts of it. So it's meaningless to ask what the energy of just one branch is.



You can use any energy units you like. GeV is a perfectly valid energy unit.
How do you determine or compute the energy of the whole quantum state? can it be done? for example... Schrodinger being entangled to the radioactive source? do you weigh Schrodinger and the radioactive source?
 
25,248
6,385
How do you determine or compute the energy of the whole quantum state? can it be done?
Of course, you just apply the Hamiltonian operator to the state.

for example... Schrodinger being entangled to the radioactive source? do you weigh Schrodinger and the radioactive source?
In non-relativistic QM, mass and energy are not the same, so weighing things doesn't tell you anything about their energy.

I strongly suggest that you spend some time working through a QM textbook such as Ballentine. We are getting to the point where a "B" level thread simply isn't sufficient.
 

Want to reply to this thread?

"Never-ending experiments in MWI" You must log in or register to reply here.

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving

Hot Threads

Top