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Newtonian Probability Distributions

  1. Oct 29, 2005 #1
    How would the probability distribution (|psi|^2) look for a Newtonian particle if it were confined in a box?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 29, 2005 #2

    Gokul43201

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    AQF : We can't say a thing unless you first attempt the problem yourself and show what you've tried. If you didn't actually read the guidelines before agreeing to them, please read the sticky at the top of this forum.

    Here it is : https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=94380
     
  4. Oct 31, 2005 #3
    Here is what I got so far:
    (I am unable to upload an image for some reason.) I have the probability on the y-axis and x on the x-axis. My probability function is a straight line,
    How do you reconcile this with Newtonian Mechanics for high n?
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2005
  5. Oct 31, 2005 #4

    siddharth

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    AQF, Did you find out the wavefunction for a particle confined in a box? Can you post the wavefunction you got?
     
  6. Oct 31, 2005 #5
    This is just qualitative.
     
  7. Oct 31, 2005 #6

    Gokul43201

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    [QUOTE='AQF]Here is what I got so far:
    (I am unable to upload an image for some reason.) I have the probability on the y-axis and x on the x-axis. My probability function is a straight line,[/quote]That's called a uniform probability density.
    What is "n" in Newtonian Mechanics ??
     
  8. Nov 1, 2005 #7
    I mean “n”, the number of wave crests in the probability distribution, as defined in quantum mechanics. Apparently, when n is very high, this approximates the Newtonian situation. I cannot figure out why.

    Thanks for your help so far.

    From your comment, I assume that my idea for the Newtonian Distribution is correct, right?
     
  9. Nov 1, 2005 #8

    ZapperZ

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    There is something VERY weird about this. I've read 3 of the threads that you have started. You seem to be using the "terminology" as used in QM. Yet, I have a very strong suspicion that you do not understand what they are beyond a superficial, literal meaning of the word.

    May I know what level of QM you are working on right now?

    Zz.
     
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