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Newton's Law of Graviation

  1. Sep 15, 2005 #1
    :smile:

    Dirac.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2005
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 15, 2005 #2

    arildno

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    Well, what is the definition of "g"?
     
  4. Sep 15, 2005 #3

    arildno

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    It is true that "g" has units of force per mass, but that is not what I asked you about.

    What is the standard meaning of "g"?
    Hint: It has a name all by itself..
     
  5. Sep 15, 2005 #4

    arildno

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    No, it is called the "acceleration due to gravity".
    Have you heard that expression before?
     
  6. Sep 15, 2005 #5

    arildno

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    You never said what "g" was, only A!
    In your problem, it should be interpreted as the acceleration at the Earth's surface.

    So, letting M be the Earth's mass, we have that g=M/R^2
    Is that enough of a hint?
     
  7. Sep 15, 2005 #6

    arildno

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    I forgot it..
    It should be g=GM/R^2
     
  8. Sep 15, 2005 #7
    I think the ingredient's you need are f=GmM/r/r Newtons law of gravity and f=ma then you prove the rest simply by definition of small g=a at r=R. You do a few substitutions and you are there. You are probably having problems with the formalism of the process?
     
  9. Sep 16, 2005 #8

    HallsofIvy

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    This has gone on for 6 responses now and I still wonder: What are you asking about Newton's law of gravity???
     
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