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Nitrogen fixation process of bacteria

  1. Sep 12, 2004 #1
    I was just reading something in my chem book about the nitrogen fixation process of bacteria. It said that trees need the bacteria to do this process. As a side thought, I think trees are mostly carbon, and a seed grows relatively fast. I was just wondering where does a seed get this large supply of carbon from to become so big so fast. Is there alot of carbon in the soil?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2004 #2

    Tide

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    I'd guess it's from the atmosphere (about 340 ppm). Soil contains about 200 ppm carbon but that would require serious migration of C through the soil.
     
  4. Sep 12, 2004 #3
    Yeah must be, cause through hydroponics (is that how you spell it?) you can grow plants on small pebble rocks. So there is no soil, and thus no carbon for the plant to obvtain from the ground. I guess its the CO2 in the air that plants get their carbon from? I know they use CO2 for energy, or is it a biproduct of their synthesis. Hmm, now im all confused. Im no good at botany.
     
  5. Sep 12, 2004 #4

    Tide

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    I can only guess at these things - we need a biologist here! Anyone?
     
  6. Sep 12, 2004 #5
    LOL, we need bill nye the science guy! What ever happened to him. NO NO NO, this is a question for the master, Carl Sagan. I wish I was born earlier so I could meet the guy before he died. He seems like such a cool person. His series cosmos was so well made, even by todays standards. He wasent some dorky scientist. He was classy and thought provoking and made things seem very interesting and intriguing.
     
  7. Sep 12, 2004 #6
    Yes you are right the carbon comes form the CO2 in air. The CO2 is not really used for energy, the energy comes form the sunlight that falls on the leaves, this energy is used to combine water and carbondioxide into carbohydrates and oxygen (that is why the process is called photosynthesis).
     
  8. Sep 12, 2004 #7

    Tide

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    Thanks, gerben!
     
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