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No Clue!

  1. Feb 10, 2005 #1
    y=logx4
    state domain and range, x-intercept, vertical asymptote.

    I have never seen a question like this before.

    Please help me!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 10, 2005 #2

    arildno

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    It might be easier to find what you're after by the rewriting:
    [tex]x^{y}=4[/tex]
     
  4. Feb 10, 2005 #3

    arildno

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    Note that since for real exponents, the exponential is only defined for positive numbers, so the maximal domain for x is x>0.
    Try and find out the range and where a vertical asymptote must be!
     
  5. Feb 10, 2005 #4

    dextercioby

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    HINT:It may be much easier if u rewrote it:
    [tex] y(x)=\frac{\ln 4}{\ln x} [/tex]

    Daniel.
     
  6. Feb 10, 2005 #5

    arildno

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    Oops!!
    x=1 must be excluded from the domain!
     
  7. Feb 10, 2005 #6
    :( this is so sad. because I completely dont understand this at all. it just makes absolutely no sense to me... is there any way it could be explained to me any easier?
     
  8. Feb 10, 2005 #7
    vertical asymptote... 4? :s
     
  9. Feb 10, 2005 #8

    dextercioby

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    What's the definition of a vertical asymptote...?

    Daniel.
     
  10. Feb 10, 2005 #9

    arildno

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    Erin sharpe:
    Do you understand the transformation:
    [tex]y=log_{x}4\to{x}^{y}=4\to{y}=\frac{ln(4)}{ln(x)}[/tex]
    (the last step was given by Daniel)
     
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