Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

No duality

  1. Nov 30, 2005 #1
    1. I always thought that the word duality in QM referes to unmeasured (wave-like)/ measured (particle-like). So am I wrong?
    2. Is that Marcella paper freely available on the net or another source that covers its content?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 6, 2005 #2
    Duality means exactly that - the 'things' act like waves and particles in different experiments, double slit etc.

    No idea on the Marcella
     
  4. Dec 7, 2005 #3

    vanesch

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I found the quote particularly well written... just to find out that it was Zapperz who wrote it :smile:

    Couldn't agree more with what he said.
     
  5. Dec 7, 2005 #4
    But Nick Herbert describes in his "Quantum reality" the wave/ particle coexistence as unmeasured/ measured duality. Turning down the brightness until only spots are on the phosphor plate reveals particle-like reality if measurements take place. The distribution of the spots shows wave-like reality between the measurements.

    So acording to Herbert there is no duality between experiments, only some experiments (double slit) reveal the crazy quantum behavior between measurements better than others (photoelectric).
     
  6. Dec 7, 2005 #5
    The duality is mean that quantum object is not a particle and is not a wave. What is it? May be it is some-thing another? May be suitable another model? As an alternative to wave-particle duality I can consider the model based on background of pilots-waves deBroigle-Boum. In this Pilot Model a local test particle we can measure as wave whats follow from WAVE-PILOTS BACKGROUND.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2005
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: No duality
  1. Duality of electrons (Replies: 28)

  2. Understanding duality (Replies: 36)

Loading...