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No mixed marriages

  1. Oct 16, 2009 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    Apparently that would include the child of a mixed marriage who now resides in the White House.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 16, 2009 #2
    Wow, what a dumb reason. I'm half Irish and half Filipino but I've never had any problem getting along with my friends with either background.
     
  4. Oct 16, 2009 #3
    Direct citation appreciated.
     
  5. Oct 16, 2009 #4

    Astronuc

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    Interracial couple denied marriage license in La.
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091015/ap_on_re_us/us_interracial_rebuff [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Oct 16, 2009 #5
    I don't get why people are upset about this; it is pretty much equivalent what is happening with refusing to marry gay people. They are just protecting the sanctity of marriage. :rolleyes:
     
  7. Oct 16, 2009 #6
    Those black people he speaks of are already mixed. I'm sure he is too.
     
  8. Oct 16, 2009 #7
    that's what happens when one group of people tells another group how to behave or else...
     
  9. Oct 16, 2009 #8
    All marriages are mixed.
     
  10. Oct 16, 2009 #9
    Does that make all divorces singular?
     
  11. Oct 16, 2009 #10

    mheslep

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    Why is the government in the business of granting marriage licenses to begin with? Legally, partnering up or whatever the state calls it should be the same legal process as changing your name, and no more. Maybe the state has some interest in the case of disease or such, but even that's more of an individual issue than marital. The societal issues should be handled by other non-governmental institutions. That is, get your 'partner' license from the government and then get married in a church if you want, with the government having no say about the latter. That way the Justice O' t Peace in La could stick to traffic court.
     
  12. Oct 16, 2009 #11

    Astronuc

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    Marriage is a civil contract with many legal ramifications. Property and estate rights are a big part of marriage.
     
  13. Oct 16, 2009 #12

    turbo

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    There is no surprise from this quarter. Having worked in the deep south doing consulting work, I have had to deal with racial prejudice. When I hired on with GP, I was the industry specialist for pulp and paper, and my project manager (who took care of addressing our new division's needs with company resources, etc) was a very personable, talented black man who had formerly been an engineer in the Navy's nuclear sub program. We generally traveled as a team, and whenever we did projects in the south, the dynamic was interesting. Even in cities like Atlanta (that had black mayors during that period) we had to be careful to stay in "safe" places and eat in chain restaurants with decent policies (not Denny's for sure).

    In mills in south Georgia and Alabama, I saw black people being denigrated and called names by white workers. In one particular mill in Alabama, I found a lot of potentially serious errors in the new process-control software for a power-boiler upgrade (serious, as in blowing up a high-pressure boiler and killing people). My on-site manager did a great job documenting my changes, revising the training manuals, and making sure that the materials were delivered on-time. The next year, the division manager got an ultimatum: Send me and ONLY me to troubleshoot and document the automation of the mill's second power boiler and we would get the project with no bidding. Otherwise, GP would have to bid against other companies to get the work. The lead engineer on the first project was pretty ticked about having a black guy working in his office for a whole month, and GP asked (required) me to take the project without my field manager in order to get the work, because the mill manager had given us a bunch of favorable recommendations with other mills.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2009
  14. Oct 16, 2009 #13

    turbo

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    Property and estate are pretty big ones, but perhaps the most heart-wrenching are personal. If a person falls ill, and their family doesn't like the fact that they are involved with a same-sex partner, they can (legally) deny the partner any say in treatment, ongoing care, etc. They can even deny the partner visitation rights in the hospital at a time when it is critical to both.
     
  15. Oct 16, 2009 #14

    Astronuc

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    True - it's the custodial rights which can be critical and heart-wrenching. Besides property and estate are liabilities/legal accountability.
     
  16. Oct 16, 2009 #15

    Ivan Seeking

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    I'm not sure, but I think the old problem of kissin cousins may be part of the issue.

    That is to say that it is illegal to marry your sister, first or second cousin, etc.
     
  17. Oct 16, 2009 #16
    I've seen lot of people supporting same sex marriage, but against polygamy. I do not understand the logic.
     
  18. Oct 16, 2009 #17

    Evo

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    A lot of famous people have married their first cousins, Einstein, for one. His second wife Elsa, was his maternal 1st cousin and his paternal second cousin.
     
  19. Oct 16, 2009 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    As far as I know: The reason that we have laws against that is to avoid producing children who have disorders related to inbreeding. The degree of separation required varies a bit according to the State.
     
  20. Oct 16, 2009 #19

    Evo

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  21. Oct 16, 2009 #20

    Ivan Seeking

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    This is all going by memory from many years ago, but my impression has always been that the degree of separation has increased over just the last fifty years or so. Even when my dad was a kid living in South Dakota, it was common to marry a cousin. And it was tough not to because there were areas along the Black Hills where EVERYONE was a relative.
     
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