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I Non-conductor made antenna?

  1. Feb 2, 2017 #1
    Could an antenna made from a non-conductor or a poor conductor?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2017 #2

    berkeman

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    What is your background in antennas?

    Having asked that, I have looked a bit into ways to try to make a hybrid optical/EM antenna, but am still working on that.

    What is your application?
     
  4. Feb 3, 2017 #3
    to receive solar energy
     
  5. Feb 3, 2017 #4

    ZapperZ

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    You really should get into the habit of posting a more elaborate question, especially with a bit of reasoning thrown in to describe why you are seeking such a thing.

    For example:

    1. If all you want is to "receive solar energy", why are you opting for an antenna?

    2. If all you want is to "receive solar energy", why does the antenna need to be a "a non-conductor or a poor conductor"?

    3. What exactly is this "solar energy" that you want? It is a rather broad EM spectrum. Are you hoping to collect ALL of it, even the UV and IR?

    Zz.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2017 #5

    Baluncore

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    Yes. A dielectric lens could be used to focus EM energy onto a semiconductor mixer or ferrite rotator.
    You do need to be much more specific with your question if you actually want a useful answer.
     
  7. Feb 3, 2017 #6
    LENS? focus energy into a mixer? ferrite rotator?!!
    Could you be more elaborate or give some examples, or URL?
     
  8. Feb 3, 2017 #7
    Solar energy is a kind of EM waves....so I am using antenna to receive it!

    Baluncore know what I am talking about. He has answered several of my questions with great idea.
     
  9. Feb 3, 2017 #8

    berkeman

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    Search on Rectenna...
     
  10. Feb 3, 2017 #9

    Baluncore

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    Not until you identify the wavelength range of the proposed antenna, and explain what you are really trying to do.
     
  11. Feb 3, 2017 #10
    about 800 nm to receive sun light
     
  12. Feb 3, 2017 #11

    berkeman

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    Did you do the search I asked for?
     
  13. Feb 3, 2017 #12
    it is not on the topic I asked.
     
  14. Feb 3, 2017 #13

    fresh_42

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    The less you specify your goals, the broader the answers.
    And this one is on topic. The more as you didn't answer:
     
  15. Feb 3, 2017 #14

    Baluncore

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    For 800 nm, look for a molecule that can be activated by a photon with an energy of 1.55 eV.
     
  16. Feb 4, 2017 #15
    what is that? You told me there are lens? antenna? mixer? ferrite rotator?
    What kind of frequency do they use?
     
  17. Feb 4, 2017 #16

    Baluncore

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    That was before you released the critical wavelength information.
    Microwave frequencies.
     
  18. Feb 4, 2017 #17
    tell me more on microwave region......
     
  19. Feb 4, 2017 #18

    Baluncore

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  20. Feb 5, 2017 #19
    An antenna can collect energy from the whole space while a molecule can only be excited if the light shine directly on it.
    I want an antenna.
     
  21. Feb 5, 2017 #20

    Baluncore

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    A metal half-wave dipole antenna would only be 400 nm long so it would have a capture area of about 10-12 m2.
    You need an array of molecules like an algal-film or a leaf.

    You would cook a non-metalic antenna in sunlight if you used a parabolic reflector or a lens.
     
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