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Non-constant particle mass?

  1. Jan 9, 2013 #1
    In the book "The Physics of Semiconductors" by Marius Grundmann, there is a note on one of the pages, saying:
    I have never heard of a case where a particle would have a non-constant mass, is there any such case at all?
     
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  3. Jan 9, 2013 #2

    DrDu

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    Electrons and holes in semiconductors are quasi-particles. They have an "effective mass" which is given in terms of the second derivative of the band dispersion. This mass can vary if the band structure varies.
     
  4. Jan 9, 2013 #3
    In that case it would be more like a quasi-electron, not a real electron, right? Because the electron itself still has a constant mass.
     
  5. Jan 9, 2013 #4

    DrDu

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    In Solid state theory, you take it usually for granted that the electrons you are talking about are quasi-electrons in reality.
     
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