Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Non-photonic 'telescopes'

  1. Oct 30, 2005 #1

    Nereid

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Being a light-hearted discussion! :smile:

    There are the neutrino telescopes, of which AMANDA is my favourite (though only Super-K has detected (imaged is too strong a term) any astronomical object ... yet).

    There are the gravitational wave detectors, of which LIGO gets all the attention; no detections of anything astrophysical ... yet. Of those planned, I think LISA is the most exciting.

    While not exactly a 'telescope', the Pierre Auger Observatory might 'see' a point source before tooo long.

    AFAIK, the only other 'cosmic ray telescope' that might detect point sources is LOFAR, but it's very early days for that.

    Did I miss any?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 31, 2005 #2

    hellfire

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    As far as I know LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) is a radio telescope. And I think the Pierre Auger does basically detect photons from Cerenkov radiation (I may be wrong).
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2005
  4. Oct 31, 2005 #3

    SpaceTiger

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    One might consider including dust-collectors (like Stardust) and rovers. There are also many dark matter detectors being deployed, which could theoretically detect a variety of non-photonic objects.
     
  5. Nov 1, 2005 #4

    Chronos

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2015 Award

    While not un-photonic, low frequency surveys [like LOFAR as hellfire mentioned] will map the universe to great depths and resolve many current issues. But, like Nereid, I can't wait for a neutrino telescopes to go online.
     
  6. Nov 1, 2005 #5

    Nereid

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    LOFAR is indeed a detector of radio photons.

    However, it should also be an extraordinarily good detector of HECRs! To quote: "The primary observable is the intense radio pulse that is produced when a primary CR hits the atmosphere and produces an Extensive Air Shower (EAS). An EAS is aligned along the direction of motion of the primary particle, and a substantial part of its component consists of electron-positron pairs which emit radio emission in the terrestrial magnetosphere (e.g., geo-synchrotron emission)."

    Pierre Auger is "... a "hybrid detector," employing two independent methods to detect and study high-energy cosmic rays. One technique is ground-based and detects high energy particles through their interaction with water. The other technique tracks the development of air showers by observing ultraviolet light emitted high in the Earth's atmosphere."

    There are several (imaging) air cherenkov telescopes (e.g. MAGIC, H.E.S.S., Cangaroo), but they are photon detectors (hundreds of GeV to TeV gammas).

    I thought about dust collectors, and also those folk who tirelessly analyse meteors trajectories, looking for interstellar visitors among the locals example, see Session 10); I guess they are a kind of telescope.

    I guess that, in principle, at least some of the DM detectors might provide direction information. Anyway, as ST says, there are several, an initial list:
    CDMS (a US collaboration)
    UK Dark Matter Project (at least four different types of detector!)
    HDMS - Heidelberg Dark Matter Search)
    XENON, another large consortium
    ORPHEUS

    Whew, more than I expected to find!
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2005
  7. Nov 2, 2005 #6

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I built a sonic telescope a while back. Haven't managed to pick up anything extraterrestrial yet. :uhh:
     
  8. Nov 2, 2005 #7

    Garth

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Not even Message in the Sky ?

    I'm disappointed. :smile:

    Garth
     
  9. Nov 2, 2005 #8

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    What a hoot! :rofl:

    I'll have to get bigger headphones for my 'scope and try again.
     
  10. Nov 2, 2005 #9

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Let me know your observing schedule, and I'll try to keep my guitar amp turned down during those periods. I hate light pollution, but I never considered that someone might be observing in the audio frequencies. :tongue2:

    Anybody here building an olefactory telescope? :uhh:
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2005
  11. Nov 2, 2005 #10

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Thanks, Turbo. I wish more people were that considerate.:smile:

    My cousin did indeed attempt observing with a smelloscope a few years ago. Unfortunately, when he got his first serious sniff of vacuum he expired. :frown:
     
  12. Nov 2, 2005 #11

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I am devastated! The olefactory properties of the vacuum could not possibly have led to your cousin's demise, but my old hiking boots..... How can I live with myself?
     
  13. Nov 2, 2005 #12

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Well... if he was spying on you hiking instead of doing what he was supposed to be, he got what he deserved.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Non-photonic 'telescopes'
  1. Radio Telescopes (Replies: 0)

  2. Building Telescopes (Replies: 3)

  3. Telescopes & astronomy (Replies: 6)

  4. Muons and telescopes (Replies: 4)

  5. Telescopes (Basics) (Replies: 15)

Loading...