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Nonacademic research jobs

  1. Feb 9, 2009 #1
    do these exist outside of industry (in say, government, etc where you dont have to work for a boss) if you get a MS or phD in applied math or engineering? the only ones i can think of off the top of my head would be in the national labs like los alamos, oak ridge, etc

    how much do these jobs pay? how competitive are they to get? in these jobs, do you get to use alot of what you learned in school unlike if you were to work for an engineering company? you dont have to deal with office politics and a rude boss, etc, am i right?
     
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  3. Feb 9, 2009 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    What makes you think you don't have a boss in industry or a national lab?
     
  4. Feb 10, 2009 #3
    also, what are some good careers out there if i like mathematical modeling, applied math (DEs, PDEs, linear algebra, probability,etc) and physics, but want to work on something more applied and less theoretical and i dont want to use too much computer science (i've only taken 1 programming class, c++, and didnt like it). i also HATE hands on work and working on experiments

    i also want to find a job in industry or governmental lab.

    i've thought about computational fluid dynamics or working on modeling of aircraft and missiles for a defense contractor

    working on aircraft and missiles sounds like fun
     
  5. Feb 11, 2009 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    Cypherscouter, you will have a very tough time of it. You are asking for a job that doesn't involve computers, doesn't involve hands on work, and doesn't have a boss.

    I'm fairly sure there are no such jobs.
     
  6. Feb 11, 2009 #5

    ZapperZ

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    I echo Vanadium's puzzlement on where you got the idea that one has no "boss" when working in a Nat'l lab. The person who HIRED you will be your boss, and he has a boss himself, and his boss has a boss, and his boss's boss also has a boss... leading all the way to the Secretary of the Dept. of Energy.

    Zz.
     
  7. Feb 11, 2009 #6

    Andy Resnick

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    Who in their right mind is going to hire someone to design missles and aircraft, when that person states they don't like computers, don't like 'hands on work', and don't want to perform experiments? You sound like someone who feels it is their right to sit around all day, doing nothing of consequence, and get paid for it.
     
  8. Feb 11, 2009 #7
    Research often involves plenty of hands on work, but most definitely using computers and lots of experiments. Slide rules went out of date a long time ago.
     
  9. Feb 11, 2009 #8
    Hell, even the Secretary of Energy's boss is President Obama.
     
  10. Feb 11, 2009 #9

    tmc

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    Computational Fluid Dynamics and modeling are both pretty much full-time programming. In fact, they're pretty much the two areas of physics and engineering which use the most programming.
     
  11. Feb 11, 2009 #10

    G01

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    You should research what type of work is actually involved in the fields you mention.

    If you don't want to do hands on work, then your stuck with modeling and theory, which involve ALOT of programming, especially in the fields you mention.
     
  12. Feb 11, 2009 #11
    well i guess programming and computers are ok, i heavily prefer it over experimental and hands on work.

    what about statisticans for companies? do they get to use lots of math and not use computers as much as those in applied math research?

    i'm willing to for a boss
     
  13. Feb 12, 2009 #12

    tmc

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    No, statisticians are also full-time programmers

    What you would want is fundamental theory or pure math, both of which have very, very little work in industry.
     
  14. Feb 12, 2009 #13
    ok, i'd be willing to do programming
     
  15. Feb 12, 2009 #14
    I want to play professional basketball, but I don't want to play for a coach. Also, I hate dribbling. Can anybody help me?
     
  16. Feb 13, 2009 #15

    G01

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    Computers have become a major tool used in theory and mathematical modeling. If you want to work in any quantitative discipline, chances are you are going to be using a computer. It's just part of the job.
     
  17. Feb 13, 2009 #16
    Obama's bosses (in theory) are the people, so technically you're your own boss in a round about sense!
     
  18. Feb 14, 2009 #17

    I think that this quote was overlooked completely. Love it uman.
     
  19. Mar 16, 2009 #18
    I'm a mathematician and I use a computer more than I use my brain.
     
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