1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Normal Force

  1. Jun 14, 2005 #1

    DDS

    User Avatar

    A block of mass m is placed on a wedge. The wedge is pushed along a horizontal surface with accelertation a, so that the block stays in place on the wedge, even though there is no friction between the block and the wedge. The normal force acting on the block during the acceleration is equal to:

    mg/cos(theta)

    i kind of guessed this answer but now when i go sti down and try to understand why is mg/cos(theta) not jsut simply mgcos(theta) i dont know why.

    can anyone explain this to me
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 14, 2005 #2

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Consider that for the block not to slide down the wedge it must be in vertical equilibrium.
     
  4. Jun 14, 2005 #3

    DDS

    User Avatar

    can anyone give me adetailed explanation its jsut my exam is in 2 days so not to bash you DOC but im looking for a detailed explanation
     
  5. Jun 15, 2005 #4

    OlderDan

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Draw yourself a diagram of the block and the forces acting on it. There are only two. One is its weight and the other is the normal force acting perpendicular to the surface of the wedge. Without friction, the wedge cannot exert a force in any other direcion. The sum of those two forces is the net force acting on the block, causing it to accerlerate horizontally. What does that (and Doc's suggestion) tell you about the vertical component of the net force?
     
  6. Jun 15, 2005 #5

    DDS

    User Avatar

    it has a component i both the x and y plane
     
  7. Jun 15, 2005 #6

    OlderDan

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    If the net force had a vertical component, the mass would accelerate in the vertical (y) direction. It is only accelerating in the horizontal (x) direction. That tells you the vertical component of the normal force cancels the vertical gravitiational force. The reusltant of the normal force and gravity must be the horizontal component of the normal force, and that force provides the acceleration of the block.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Normal Force
  1. Normal Force! (Replies: 3)

  2. Normal force (Replies: 5)

Loading...