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Homework Help: Normalising a Wave Function

  1. Feb 27, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    http://www.ph.qmul.ac.uk/~phy319/problems/problems1.doc"
    Question 2)b

    3. The attempt at a solution

    http://img685.imageshack.us/img685/9033/p270210111001.jpg [Broken]

    Is this correct?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 27, 2010 #2

    vela

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    No. The parameter [itex]\alpha[/itex] should appear in the answer. Your set-up looks fine, though.
     
  4. Feb 27, 2010 #3
    But once we take out the infinity terms after the integral, we're left with the [itex]\alpha[/itex] terms, one is + and one is -, so they cancel.

    What is it I'm doing wrong here?

    Thanks!
     
  5. Feb 27, 2010 #4

    vela

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    They can't cancel or else you'd be left with N2x0=1, which has no solution. Recheck the sign on each term.
     
  6. Feb 27, 2010 #5
    I can't seem to find the problem, anyone care to take a look?

    The only reason I can think of is the original way I set up the integrals, and whether I add them or subtract them!
     
  7. Feb 27, 2010 #6

    vela

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    [tex]\left[\frac{1}{-2\alpha}e^{-2\alpha x}\right]^\infty_0 \ne -\frac{1}{2\alpha}[/tex]
     
  8. Feb 27, 2010 #7
    Ahhhhhh, I see now, thank you VERY much! :) Let the studying continue!
     
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