Norway's Constitution Day

  • Thread starter arildno
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation revolved around the celebration of May 17th, which marks the anniversary of Norway's first constitution. The day is celebrated with a Children's Parade and parties for 18-year-olds who have finished 12 years of school. The conversation also touched on Norwegian customs and greetings, as well as the upcoming 100th anniversary of Norwegian independence. There were also discussions about the beauty of Norway and its freedom from the EU. Overall, the conversation was filled with well-wishes and admiration for Norway.
  • #1

arildno

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Gold Member
Dearly Missed
10,123
137
On May 17th, 1814, Norway got its first constitution.
The most prominent feature on our day of celebration is the Children's Parade, where the children in the neighbourhood form a parade and wave Norwegian flags and yell "Hooray!".
The adults line up all the way where the parade is coming, and "hooray" as well when the parade passes them.

The slightly bigger "children" in Norway, i.e the 18-year olds who celebrate that they're finished with 12 years school, have a different sort of celebration throughout the first two and a half weeks of May leading up to May 17th:
They party practically non-stop, driving about, for example in large buses with ghetto-blasters spewing out music at full volume in the middle of the night (yes, it can be quite annoying if you really wanted to sleep..)

On May 17th, they round up their former teachers about 6.00 A.M and drive them off to a nice breakfast.

In general, the "russ'es", as they're called, are doing their best to excel in non-malicious "disorderly conduct", while we others say to each other in feigned, shocked tones: "We never did THAT when we were russ!".
Or, if they have behaved "too nicely", we get disappointed, and think they've been lame this year.


This year is quite special in that on 7th of June, we'll celebrate the first century of Norwegian independence; the union between Norway and Sweden ended in 1905.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
arildno said:
On May 17th, 1814, Norway got its first constitution.
What's Norweedish for 'Congratulations'? :biggrin:
 
  • #3
Danger said:
What's Norweedish for 'Congratulations'? :biggrin:

'Gratulerer' (grah-to-leh-rer) hard r's, not them soft american r's :biggrin:

Gratulerer med dagen Norge! (Happy birthday Norway!)
 
Last edited:
  • #4
Danger said:
What's Norweedish for 'Congratulations'? :biggrin:
I didn't realize how many Norweeds we had at PF. :smile:

Gratulerer med dagen Norge!
 
  • #5
Evo said:
I didn't realize how many Norweeds we had at PF. :smile:
Yeah, that country must be bigger than I thought.

Gratulerer med dagen Norge! :biggrin:
 
  • #6
Jäj snacker icke Norsk, men jäj önskar er lycka og välmå på min Scandinaviska!

(I don't speak Norwegian, but I wish you luck and prosperity in Scandinavian (a terrible mix of Scandinavian languages).

And thanks for the info on Newtons personality, arildno! Oh, and you did not by any chance get a free breakfast, did you?
 
  • #7
arildno said:
On May 17th, 1814, Norway got its first constitution.
The most prominent feature on our day of celebration is the Children's Parade, where the children in the neighbourhood form a parade and wave Norwegian flags and yell "Hooray!".
The adults line up all the way where the parade is coming, and "hooray" as well when the parade passes them.

The slightly bigger "children" in Norway, i.e the 18-year olds who celebrate that they're finished with 12 years school, have a different sort of celebration throughout the first two and a half weeks of May leading up to May 17th:
They party practically non-stop, driving about, for example in large buses with ghetto-blasters spewing out music at full volume in the middle of the night (yes, it can be quite annoying if you really wanted to sleep..)

On May 17th, they round up their former teachers about 6.00 A.M and drive them off to a nice breakfast.

In general, the "russ'es", as they're called, are doing their best to excel in non-malicious "disorderly conduct", while we others say to each other in feigned, shocked tones: "We never did THAT when we were russ!".
Or, if they have behaved "too nicely", we get disappointed, and think they've been lame this year.


This year is quite special in that on 7th of June, we'll celebrate the first century of Norwegian independence; the union between Norway and Sweden ended in 1905.

I hope you have a nice day. :rolleyes:

You know, the best things of these sort of days is you haven't have to go to work or to the university.
 
  • #8
Clausius2 said:
I hope you have a nice day. :rolleyes:

You know, the best things of these sort of days is you haven't have to go to work or to the university.

...and you get to study/work at home instead. Indeed wonderful. :smile: :wink:
 
  • #9
I never been to Norway only to Denmark and I remember only one thing when I was in Kopenhagen ; tons of hot chicks !
 
  • #10
hej Arildno

Have a great National day! I love Norway, the best place in the world that I have ever visited - awesome scenery and lovely people.
You know what the best bit was though?? - You're not in the Stupid EU!
Stay free, celebrate!
 
  • #11
Syttende mai er Norges grunnlovsdag, nasjonaldagen fremfor noen annen!
 
  • #12
Happy Constitution Day!

Although part Finn, I am also a Swede. And I still prefer to think of Norway as west Sweden. :biggrin:
 
  • #13
arildno said:
In general, the "russ'es", as they're called, are doing their best to excel in non-malicious "disorderly conduct", while we others say to each other in feigned, shocked tones: "We never did THAT when we were russ!".
Yeah, I never do that either. :tongue:

Happy Constitution Day!

(btw, great country you got there - I visited Stavenger and Oslo a few years ago.)
 
  • #14
you guys did great job in nationalizing oil production, but when Canada wanted to do the same they cried communism !
 

1. What is Norway's Constitution Day?

Norway's Constitution Day, also known as "Syttende Mai" or "17th of May", is a national holiday celebrating the signing of the Norwegian Constitution on May 17, 1814. It is considered the most important day in Norwegian history.

2. How is Norway's Constitution Day celebrated?

The day is celebrated with parades, concerts, speeches, and other festivities throughout the country. The Norwegian flag, also known as the "flag of Norway", is prominently displayed and worn as a symbol of national pride and unity.

3. What is the significance of Norway's Constitution?

Norway's Constitution is one of the oldest in the world and is considered a symbol of Norway's independence and sovereignty. It established a democratic government and gave people certain rights and freedoms, including freedom of speech and religion.

4. Are there any traditional foods or drinks associated with Norway's Constitution Day?

Yes, there are several traditional foods and drinks associated with the celebration. These include "bunad", a traditional costume worn on special occasions, "pølse i lompe", a hot dog wrapped in potato pancake, and "rømmegrøt", a sour cream porridge.

5. Are there any customs or rituals associated with Norway's Constitution Day?

One of the most well-known customs is the "bunad parade", where children and adults march in traditional costumes. Another popular ritual is singing the national anthem, "Ja, vi elsker dette landet" (Yes, We Love This Country), during the celebrations.

Suggested for: Norway's Constitution Day

Replies
11
Views
904
Replies
4
Views
488
Replies
8
Views
930
Replies
1
Views
697
Replies
2
Views
892
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
864
Back
Top