Nuclear binding energy problem

In summary, the nuclear binding energy of N-14 in joules per mole of nuclei can be calculated by converting the given mass deficit into kilograms and then using it in the equation E=mc^2. However, it is important to note that the mass of a mole of nitrogen atoms is not 1.1278 x 10^-1 kg/mol, but rather 14 g/mol. This correction should be taken into account for an accurate calculation.
  • #1
bree1622
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What is the nuclear binding energy of N-14 in joules per mole of nuclei?
The mass deficit is 0.11278. Atomic mass is 14.00307. Total mass is 14.11585.
I keep getting stuck after converting and substituting it into the equation.
First I converted the mass deficit into kilograms. 0.11278 =1.1278 × 10^-1KG. Then I put into equation. E=mc2=1.1278 × 10^-1 kgmol × (2.998×108ms)^2 . I am not quite sure if this is right so far or what to do next. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 
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  • #2
bree1622 said:
First I converted the mass deficit into kilograms. 0.11278 =1.1278 × 10^-1KG.
Is that so? What is the mass of a mole of nitrogen atoms, for example?
 
  • #3
mjc123 said:
Is that so? What is the mass of a mole of nitrogen atoms, for example?
Is one mole of nitrogen 28g?
 
  • #4
I said one mole of nitrogen atoms, so the answer is 14 g, or to be more precise 14.00307 g. But the point is the same. The atomic weight is the mass in g (not kg) of 1 mole. So the mass deficit is not 1.1278 x 10-1 kg/mol.
 

1. What is Nuclear Binding Energy?

Nuclear binding energy is the amount of energy required to hold the nucleus of an atom together.

2. Why is Nuclear Binding Energy important?

Nuclear binding energy is important because it explains the stability of atomic nuclei and is crucial in understanding nuclear reactions and processes.

3. What is the Nuclear Binding Energy Problem?

The Nuclear Binding Energy Problem is the discrepancy between the predicted binding energy of atomic nuclei and the experimentally measured values.

4. What causes the Nuclear Binding Energy Problem?

The Nuclear Binding Energy Problem can be caused by a variety of factors such as limitations in theoretical models and experimental techniques, as well as the complexity of nuclear forces.

5. How is the Nuclear Binding Energy Problem being addressed?

The Nuclear Binding Energy Problem is being addressed through ongoing research and advancements in nuclear physics, including the development of more accurate theoretical models and improved experimental methods.

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