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I Nuclei deformation

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  1. Oct 19, 2016 #1
    Literature survey on Nuclei deformation I found theoretical calculations and prediction however I could not find experimental considerations.
    1. How nuclei deformation confirmed?
    2. Is it possible to consider deformation modulus constant that equivalent to Yang Modulus in mechanics? Are there such estimations? or calculations?
     
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  3. Oct 19, 2016 #2

    ChrisVer

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    Let me try a blind shoot: by deformed nuclei you mean nuclei that are not spherically symmetric?
    First of all this is a consequence of the appearence of angular momentum.. a spherically symmetric wavefunction is invariant under any kind of rotational transformation...
    Secondly, recall from electrodynamics that a deformed shape of charge (nuclei contain protons) give rise to higher order-terms in the multipole expansion... so you can have quadrapole fields etc....

    I don't think you can do it... what is deformed is the probability distribution function... it's not some kind of "box" that can feel stress or anything. Of course you can make analogues but they won't tell you much (I guess).
     
  4. Oct 19, 2016 #3

    e.bar.goum

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    Deformation can be observed by the level structure. For example, the existence of a rotational band is evidence of deformation. As an example, check out the ground state band of 154Gd (just chosen randomly as a nice midshell deformed nucleus. This is a screenshot from NNDC http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/reCenter.jsp?z=64&n=90). The presence of rotational bands are indicative of deformed nuclei.(ETA: Of course there are others, e.g. transition strengths, intruder states, vibrational bands)
    Screenshot from 2016-10-20 10:37:04.png

    I'm surprised you did not find any experimental work, considering that it is an extremely active field. Here's a (very random) selection of papers that concern experimental data for deformed nuclei. (Some of these are theory papers, but do include experimental data. I've literally just randomly grabbed these from the recent PRC issues and a workshop I was just at. These do not represent a complete coverage of the field in any way)

    http://journals.aps.org/prc/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevC.94.021301
    http://journals.aps.org/prc/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevC.93.031302
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/037015739290095H
    http://journals.aps.org/rmp/abstract/10.1103/RevModPhys.83.1467
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0370269315009120
    http://journals.aps.org/prc/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevC.94.021301
    http://journals.aps.org/prc/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevC.94.044307
    http://journals.aps.org/prc/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevC.94.044314

    I would encourage you to look at chapter 5 of Krane's Introductory Nuclear Physics text. If you don't have a copy of Krane, any introductory nuclear text should cover the basics of deformed nuclei.
     
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