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Mathematica Numerical Simulations

  1. Dec 27, 2016 #1
    I'm very new to Mathematica/programming and I want to do a theoretical calculation using Mathematica,
    suppose I have,

    ##Y=CX,~~~C=constant##

    Now, I want to plot Y vs. X but X should run at every point since every point is a solution for Y, how should I do this? Before, I was thinking maybe I could just give the domain (i.e. from 0 to 100 with interval 1) and then just let Mathematica do it, but I was wrong since Mathematica should calculate the value of Y for a certain X for one round then input another point then run again, etc.

    Background:
    * I'm really a beginner, I can just do the basic stuff in Mathematica (arithmetic, calculus, etc)
    * Hands on start to mathematica (Wolfram website)
    * Mathematica: A Problem Centered Approach by Roozbeh Hazrat (https://www.amazon.com/Mathematica®...roach-Undergraduate-Mathematics/dp/1849962502)

    I will appreciate any advice on how to continue in this situation.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 27, 2016 #2

    Orodruin

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    With Mathematica's Plot command you need only specify the function to plot, the variable, and the variable's range. Mathematica will do the rest.

    Plot[C X, {X,0,100}]

    Of course, C will need to have a value for this to work.
     
  4. Dec 27, 2016 #3
    Is the plot command also used by researchers when doing their theoretical simulation (assuming mathematica can)? Is it really that easy now? I thought it was a very tedious work.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 30, 2016
  5. Dec 29, 2016 #4

    ChrisVer

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    A simple plot should not need tedious work to be plotted, because nobody wants to waste essential time of their work trying to figure out how plotting a function works... it's not the tedious part of their work...
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2016
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