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O2 + H2O is?

  1. May 23, 2007 #1
    The reason I'm asking this elementary question is that I have, now for three years running induced oxygen into my 32"deep x 16' OD fish pond. What I've found is that when I introduce the atomized oxygen into the pond, all the algae disappears within three days if I have the oxygen pump running for 4 to 6 hrs.

    What peaked my curiosity is that there are hundreds of products on the market that promote algae reduction at best and really none of them really works as well as what I just tripped over.....Yes???


    Thanks guys

    something to chew

    Robin
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. May 24, 2007 #2

    chemisttree

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    Aeration/circulation has been known for some time to reduce algae growth. Aeration sparges out excess CO2 from the water and limits the growth of algae. Also, some algae grows better in stagnant water near the margin of the pond. Circulation helps keep it in check.
     
  4. May 24, 2007 #3
    Thanks, It's interesting that you'd say that the edge of the pond is more likley to have stagnant water. I so designed the pond to be a sandwich using two flattended bowls. The lower bowl is the linner and the second interior layer allows water to penatrate down through its' mesh. The aeration is released in between this sandwich at its' central lowest elevation. The bubbles don't penatrate the mesh surface as it travels to the suface but does travel to the upper perimeter/margin of the pond, in effect circulating the water in the pond through aeration.
    I have also found that the surrounding area of the pond is allot more lush, moist. What I'm wondering is... The air is also very much cooler. And in the interest of 'globel warming'. If more people adopted an O2 + H2O induction system could we, as a collective body, be cooling the Earth?

    Thanks again

    Robin
     
  5. May 24, 2007 #4

    DaveC426913

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    1] It feels cooler because its moisture content is higher, meaning it makes for better heat transfer and thus reomoval of heat from your skin.

    2] You're using electricity to power the pump. It's generating heat and using power from a power plant. So, even if it were having a local cooling effect, the net energy usage and thus heat generation goes up.
     
  6. May 25, 2007 #5
    I'm sorry about not knowing how to post a quote as you did so I just copied and pasted... and as well as getting off of the track in-regards to the Chemistry end of things.
    Quote:
    2] You're using electricity to power the pump. It's generating heat and using power from a power plant. So, even if it were having a local cooling effect, the net energy usage and thus heat generation goes up. End Quote.

    So, if I could supplement my hydro usage or take it from a battery system that's re-energized with solar energy... this would be the next best thing I could do with what I have to work with.. Thanks Dave, Chemisttree.

    I think I might need to converse with some solar energy engineers to pursue this any further and some thermal extraction engineers so that I may be able to extract heat from my ice pack/pond, to off set some winter heating costs. Ambisious... I know but what do you get when one doesn't"t try?

    Thanks Again
    Robin
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2007
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