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Objects in space

  1. Jun 12, 2012 #1
    Hello ,i was reading a physics book and a question came up to my mind,i'm a high school student..About the rule : If objects are moving in the same speed and line,they'll cause no harm to each others..Is this rule the same in microgravity? I suppose some objects will be damaged..:)
    Thank you in advance,
    Have a nice day,
    Ps:sorry ,for my weak english skills!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 12, 2012 #2

    sophiecentaur

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    Hi and welcome.
    If two objects are moving at the same velocity then they are not (by definition) converging so they cannot damage each other. If they have mass then they will have a finite attraction force between them and their paths will converge or they may actually orbit each other, depending on the exact circs..
    Is that what you refer to as "micro gravity"?
    Could you refine your question please? (Your English skills are quite OK! God you should see some of the sloppy posts some lazy people hit us with.)
     
  4. Jun 12, 2012 #3
    I meant with ''micro gravity'' the outer space :) , I got your answer..
    Yes,that's what i was refering..
    Thank you very much ,Sophiecentaur..^^
     
  5. Jun 12, 2012 #4

    sophiecentaur

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    Objects need to be very massive before the gravitational forces are significant compared with the electric forces that give them strength. Two small planets would eventually coalesc but two rocks never would. I'm not sure where the crossover lies. . . .
     
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