Odd Black Hole Defies Explanation : space.com

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Ivan Seeking
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"Odd Black Hole Defies Explanation": space.com

Astronomers have found what appears to be a black hole 25 to 40 times the mass of our Sun, a weight class not previously known to exist.

Black holes can't be seen, because any light that enters them is trapped. So to find black holes, scientists look for intense radiation from around them as well as their gravitational effects on nearby gas and stars.

Black holes come in two distinct varieties, scientists know. A stellar black hole results from the collapse of a single, massive star and is typically a few times the mass of the Sun. Supermassive black holes anchor the centers of many galaxies and can harbor millions or billions of solar masses.

"There's a big gap there," said Philip Kaaret of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Kaaret thinks he's found one that helps fill the gap.[continued]
http://space.com/scienceastronomy/blackhole_medium_040608.html [Broken]
 
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Chronos
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any massive body can gravitationally collapse into a black hole. the mass and distance limits are well known. the consequences are not yet predictable.
 
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Ivan Seeking said:
http://space.com/scienceastronomy/blackhole_medium_040608.html [Broken]

Huhmm?..It seems that the only way to detect 'Blackholes' is to find the 'Light' that theoretically should 'NOT' be emminating from a BH!..so consequently most of the Blackholes detected so far have been really 'White-Holes' due to the enormous enegetic luminous outpourings, co-incidence?

The quoted author from the link tells me that he does not actually know the difference between a young stella object's creationary period (timescale) and the intermediate lifespan of a comparable early Galactic Star?

Q:How long does it take to produce a Star that matches the Mass of the "detected" Blackhole, What is the predected Stella Lifespan?

Q:How long does it take to produce a Blackhole that Matches an early 'baby' Stella Object, can the Blackhole's current Mass, reveal anything about the Star's lifespan that is proposed to have created it, is there a 'Time-stamp' to suggest how old the Star was at the instant it created the 'current-BH'?
 
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Olias said:
Huhmm?..It seems that the only way to detect 'Blackholes' is to find the 'Light' that theoretically should 'NOT' be emminating from a BH!..so consequently most of the Blackholes detected so far have been really 'White-Holes' due to the enormous enegetic luminous outpourings, co-incidence?

The quoted author from the link tells me that he does not actually know the difference between a young stella object's creationary period (timescale) and the intermediate lifespan of a comparable early Galactic Star?

Q:How long does it take to produce a Star that matches the Mass of the "detected" Blackhole, What is the predected Stella Lifespan?

Q:How long does it take to produce a Blackhole that Matches an early 'baby' Stella Object, can the Blackhole's current Mass, reveal anything about the Star's lifespan that is proposed to have created it, is there a 'Time-stamp' to suggest how old the Star was at the instant it created the 'current-BH'?
Actually I found some recent papers that have highlighted this very problem, for those that are interested:

http://uk.arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0406217

http://uk.arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0406218

http://uk.arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0406219

Three very interesting papers!
 

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