Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Oddball questions

  1. Feb 2, 2006 #1
    1) Is the strength of bonds in a hydrogen atom (or any atom) the same on Earth versus the "zero gravity" of space, versus a nuetron star (or a black hole)?

    2) Regarding "zero gravity", does it really exist in space? Or, is it varying amounts of micro-gravities relative to massive objects throughout the Universe?

    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2006 #2

    G01

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Answer to #2: No in reality, your gravitational field affects stars in the andromeda galaxy. But the effect, is very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very veryvery very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very veryvery very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very small
     
  4. Feb 2, 2006 #3
    :smile: Thats' kind of what I thought. Thanks.
     
  5. Feb 2, 2006 #4

    Mk

    User Avatar

    This answer is also no, the force that bonds nucleic particles is the strong nuclear force. However, near the surface of a neutron star, or near the singularity of a black hole, this force is overcame by gravity, and even particles bonded by the strong force will be ripped apart.
     
  6. Feb 4, 2006 #5
    In fact, MUCH less than that.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Oddball questions
  1. A question (Replies: 17)

  2. A question (Replies: 1)

  3. Oddball transformer (Replies: 7)

Loading...