I Ode using Fourier Transform

  • Thread starter ondine4
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Hi, let's take this ode:
y''(t) = f(t),y(0)=0, y'(0)=0.
using the FT it becomes:
-w^2 Y(w) = F(w)
Y(w)=( -1/w^2 )F(w)

so i can say that -1/w^2 is the fourier transorm of the green's function(let's call it G(w)).
then
y(t) = g(t) * f(t)
where
g(t) = F^-1 (G(w))
(inverse fourier transorm)
how can i solve the integral to find g(t)?
if f(t)=0 for t<0 and f(t)=1 for t>=0 how can i say that y(t)= 1/2t^2?



 

Delta2

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Last edited:
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First of all thank you for the answer :)
My problem is that i don't know why the inverse fourier tranform of -1/w^2 is tsgn(t).
using the definition of inverse fourier transform I have to calculate an integral from -infinity to +infinity of a function that has some issue in w=0.
I can use Jordan's lemma and the residue theorem but w=0 lies on the integration's curve and it's a second order pole.. how can i overcome this problem?
 

Delta2

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Don't use the definition of inverse fourier transform. Use the properties of fourier transform. We know that the fourier transform of sgn(t) is ##\frac{1}{iw}## (you can prove this by the definition of fourier transform). Therefore by a known property of fourier transform (property 107 here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourier_transform#Tables_of_important_Fourier_transforms)

it follows that the fourier transform of ##t~sgn(t)## will be

##i\frac{d}{dw}(\frac{1}{iw})=-\frac{1}{w^2}##
 
Last edited by a moderator:
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Thank you very much, this is a very simple and smart method to calculate some fourier transforms :) i will keep that in mind.
 

jasonRF

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If you are using the Fourier transform to solve this kind of problem then you need to be a little more careful. The solution of
[tex]
-\omega^2 Y(\omega) = F(\omega)
[/tex]
is
[tex]
Y(\omega) = - \frac{1}{\omega^2} F(\omega) + a \, \delta(\omega) + b \, \delta^\prime(\omega),
[/tex]
where ##a## and ##b## are arbitrary constants that you determine by using your initial conditions.

By the way, the Laplace transform is a more straightforward way of solving these kind of problems, in my opinion.

Jason
 
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Thank you :) yes i know that i have to add the solution of the associated homogeneus equation to find the complete solution..I wanted to use ft to solve this ode because i haven't studied laplace transform yet, thanks for the advice!
 

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