Oh dear I have to pick something to take please help

  • Thread starter Stevo11
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  • #1
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I'm halfway through my University prep year (its a univ. run course you can take if you needed the pre reqs) and I have to apply now to university but I dont know what to take...

The issue is I dont know what kind of job I will get with each course...

The course I was looking at initially was Bilogical science, but now that I see I enjoy physics as well and have been doing outstanding in it averaging right now at 102% :)

What kind of job can you get with a general physics degree? any really? or would it be smarter to go nuclear engineering or something like Health physics and radiation sciences?

While I do like physics, I also LOVE biology, coming from anyone with experience here, and disregarding any (well what do you like to do) what would be the best way to go job wise I.E income/availability etc...

Physics (general degree or an engineering) or Biology (some sort of specialist, pharma research etc)

By the way I am looking into U.O.I.T Ontario Canada

-thanks in advance for any help I'm quite flustered
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
This may help or may just confuse the situation, but there seems to me to be a lot of (research) interest in biophysics, so you might be able to continue working in both fields after your degree (should you want to).

Physics is generally seen to impart transferable/useful skills, such as problem solving, mathematics and probably computer programming/modelling, which should allow you to go for a wide range of different jobs as long as you know how to really sell your skills. I think engineering will give you a lot of opportunities as well, since it imparts the same transferable skills.

On the other hand, in the UK at least, a quick scan of job websites and the back of new scientist magazine suggests to me that there are more jobs available directly related to (advertised as) biology than to physics.

I'm afraid I can't comment on income.

Whichever you decide, as long as you work hard and continue to achieve such high grades I'm sure finding a job won't be too much of a problem!
 
  • #3
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I have a good friend with a quantitative bio degree, and a high GPA. He hasn't had a huge amount of success with employment. And by that I mean, he's employed but as a low end technician and not making very much at all. (Of course, this is one data point, and it could be entirely his fault.)

I'm finishing my B.S. in physics this week, and I'm about to hit the job market. You can get a technician or engineering type job, but you need to be able to sell your skills. For the majority of jobs, you are competing with engineers who have a leg up on you because their piece of paper says engineering on it. To be a "physicist" you need a PhD.

If you are really concerned about employment, the safest bet is probably electrical or mechanical engineering.
 

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