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Oh, dear...

  1. Oct 4, 2015 #1

    jtbell

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    I've occasionally seen posts (obviously by non native English speakers) which start out with something like "hello dear", or "hello dears". I've managed to refrain from responding "don't call me 'dear', only my wife gets to call me that". Just now I saw "hi dears" again, and did a Google search:

    https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q="hi+dears"

    :wideeyed: :eek: :-p
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 4, 2015 #2

    ZapperZ

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    Is it just a bad translator?

    I typically get that from spammers, and even once via PM on here. I told the member that it was very condescending, and he said he didn't realize that it was.

    Zz.
     
  4. Oct 4, 2015 #3

    Borek

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    I always suspected it is a lousy translation of an "opening honorific" used in some language. It happens way too often to be random.
     
  5. Oct 4, 2015 #4
    At least it's not "Hi deers".
    Not only is it deer but I don't identify as a deer.

    If it's a bad translation, these people building translators seem to a bad job.
     
  6. Oct 4, 2015 #5

    jtbell

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    That's my suspicion also. "Dears" is probably a literal translation of something that doesn't have the same connotations in the original language that "dear" (as a noun) has in English. It probably has the same function that "Hi friends" or "Hi y'all" etc. have in English.
     
  7. Oct 4, 2015 #6

    WWGD

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    I have seen the term used widely. As in emails addressed , Dear Professor, Dear Students, Dear Mr. so-and-so. Maybe it is a regional thing.
     
  8. Oct 5, 2015 #7

    Ryan_m_b

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    I think "Dear Professor" is in appropriate use of the formal salutation. "Hi dears" is a bizarre hybrid of informal followed immediately by formal. I'm sure it's a common translator error but I'd be interested to know what it originally means because it's literally "[informal greeting] [formal greeting]"

    If this is an Indian language thing do we have any Indian members reading that wanna chime in? :smile:
     
  9. Oct 5, 2015 #8

    Borek

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    Next time I see it I will check the IP of the OP.
     
  10. Oct 5, 2015 #9

    jtbell

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    Yes, that's entirely appropriate for a formal business-letter type e-mail. For a casual e-mail or forum posting it strikes me as too formal. "Hi dears" simply looks bizarre.
     
  11. Oct 5, 2015 #10

    e.bar.goum

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    There's also "Dear Sir". My usual response is to just close the tab, since the OP clearly doesn't want an answer from me. :rolleyes:

    (Also, "I have a doubt" instead of "I have a question" -- I've heard this often enough in person that I'm fairly sure that this is an Indian-who-speaks-English thing).
     
  12. Oct 6, 2015 #11

    jtbell

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    And "Dear Sir or Madam". ?:)
     
  13. Oct 6, 2015 #12

    e.bar.goum

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    Slightly better. I might respond to that. :-p
     
  14. Oct 6, 2015 #13

    Lisa!

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    Okey darlings!
     
  15. Oct 6, 2015 #14

    collinsmark

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    In the days of snail mail nearly all letters among English speakers invariably started with "Dear <insert name here>," if the letter, formal or otherwise, was addressed to any specific person. Even if one was writing a formal letter directed to the president of the United States, it would begin (after the heading) "Dear Mr. President,".

    With the advent of email a less formal tone began, and emails often began with "Hi <name>," or "Hello <name>,". That, and the comma that followed the name was sometimes replaced by the less formal exclamation mark (as in "Hi Mr. President!")

    Then Usenet News came about, along with bulletin boards and Internet forums, and all niceties were thrown out the window only to be sacrificed in a bloodthirsty, ritualistic bonfire of flames and scorn.

    ---

    But yeah, that "Hi dears" does seem to be some sort of weird hybrid of the first two. I highly suspect it at least started as a misappropriation due to writing in English as a second language. But maybe it has caught on? That's the weird and chaotic thing about the English language: it's always changing, little by little.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2015
  16. Oct 6, 2015 #15

    WWGD

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    And Dear Sir, Madam, or whatever else you may happen to be ( it exists now, after I just made it up.)
     
  17. Oct 6, 2015 #16

    Mark44

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    Would you like "Hi deer" better? This form has the advantage of being grammatically correct, since the plural of "deer" is also "deer."
    :biggrin:
     
  18. Oct 6, 2015 #17

    WWGD

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    As long it is not a Dear John letter.... (which would be strange, since I am not dating anyone).
     
  19. Oct 6, 2015 #18

    berkeman

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    Interesting -- it looks like it may not be a software translation issue..

    http://english.stackexchange.com/qu...o-show-affection-or-for-official-use-in-india

    So it may just be short for "Hello Dear Sir"... :smile:
     
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