1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Ohm's law question

  1. Apr 30, 2007 #1
    According to ohm's law, why would a light bulb burn brighter the instant prior to it burning out?

    ohm's law is R=V/I
    the ratio of potential difference to current is a constant for a given conductor. any resistance that does not change with temperature, voltage or the direction of charges obey ohm's law.

    at the instant the flow of the potential drop be higher but then due to the energy transferring to thermal the light bulb started to lose its brightens. the brighten of the bulb depends on the current that pass through, so I will assume that at the begining the current flow is larger until its reach other resistor causing the voltage to split into difference value depending on the resistance.

    Is it right?
  2. jcsd
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Can you help with the solution or looking for help too?
Draft saved Draft deleted

Similar Discussions: Ohm's law question
  1. Poiseuille's law (Replies: 0)