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Ohm's Law

  1. Aug 19, 2005 #1
    Why is Ohm's Law not an effective method for solving some electric circuits?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 19, 2005 #2
    Hye!! Why is Ohm's law not an effective method for solving some electric circuits?
     
  4. Aug 19, 2005 #3
    why does the loop rule arise as a consequence of conservation of energy?
     
  5. Aug 19, 2005 #4
    what is the relationship between the number of branch points and the number of independent current in a circuits?
     
  6. Aug 19, 2005 #5
    why is Ohm's Law not an effective method for solving some electric circuits??
     
  7. Aug 19, 2005 #6

    HallsofIvy

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    Smells like very simple homework. I'm moving this to the k-12 homework section.
    hidayah, have you tried just looking these up in your textbook?
     
  8. Aug 19, 2005 #7
    Why not dispense with formalities and list the QUESTION numbers, too. =D

    1) Why is Ohm's Law not an effective method for solving some electric circuits?
    2) Why does the loop rule arise as a consequence of conservation of energy?
    3) What is the relationship between the number of branch points and the number of independent current in a circuits?
    ...

    These are questions that test your understanding of Ohm's law. It sounds like you're having trouble with them because you haven't read the material.
    :tongue:
     
  9. Aug 19, 2005 #8
    Your first question is very vague.

    As for the 2nd and 3rd. You should think about water flowing through a pipe. Where the flowing water can be thought of as the electricity.

    ..............//
    .............//
    ======
    .............\\
    .............. \\

    When the one pipe splits into two at a junction some of the water will flow down one pipe and some down the other. How much water flows down each one can be related to say the width of the pipes. Of course the width of the pipes are analogous to the resistance of the wire.

    Now the sum of the currents going into each pipe or wire is equal that which has come from the main pipe. This in lay-mans terms is Kirchoffs law.

    Hope this helps... :smile:
     
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