Omg Chem Titration help fast

In summary, During a titration experiment, a gr11 student used an indicator, Phenolphthalein, and stopped the titration when it turned light pink. The student is wondering why only 1-2 drops of indicator are used. The reason is because the indicator has a high molar absorptivity, making it unnecessary to use more drops for a qualitative assessment. Further clarification may be needed.
  • #1
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omg Chem Titration help fast!

Ok so I'm a gr11 student who just had a titration exeriment.. and there are a couple of things that are really screwing me over!

Okay so we used an indicator, Phenolphthalein, more specifically, and when we stopped the titration when it turned light pink.

My question is, why are only 1~2 drops in indicator used?

I thought that it would be because of the indicator itself would also react with the acids and bases...but I just need some clarification here.. Can someone help me out here?
 
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  • #2
You only need that much to make the qualitative assessment; the indicator has a high molar absorptivity.
 
  • #3


Hi there! I understand that you are struggling with your titration experiment and have some questions about the use of the indicator, Phenolphthalein. Let me try to clarify a few things for you.

First of all, the reason you only use 1-2 drops of indicator is because it is a very concentrated solution and only a small amount is needed to see a color change. Using too much indicator can actually interfere with the accuracy of your titration results.

Secondly, you are correct that the indicator itself can react with the acids and bases, which is why it is important to choose an indicator that has a minimal effect on the reaction taking place. Phenolphthalein is a good choice for acid-base titrations because it only reacts with strong bases, not with weak acids or bases.

I hope this helps to clear things up for you. Good luck with your experiment! Remember to always follow the instructions carefully and don't hesitate to ask for help if you need it. Science can be challenging, but with perseverance and a curious mind, you can overcome any obstacle.
 

1. What is a titration in chemistry?

A titration in chemistry is a laboratory technique used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution by reacting it with a known concentration of another substance. It involves gradually adding the known substance, called the titrant, to the unknown substance, called the analyte, until a reaction occurs and the concentration of the analyte can be calculated.

2. Why is titration important in chemistry?

Titration is important in chemistry because it allows for the accurate determination of the concentration of a substance in a solution. This information can be useful in many practical applications, such as in pharmaceuticals, environmental analysis, and quality control in manufacturing processes.

3. How do I perform a titration?

To perform a titration, you will need a burette, a flask, a known concentration of titrant, and a solution of the analyte. First, measure a specific volume of the analyte solution into the flask. Then, add a few drops of an indicator, which will change color when the reaction is complete. Next, slowly add the titrant from the burette to the flask, swirling the flask continuously. When the indicator changes color, the reaction is complete, and the volume of titrant used can be used to calculate the concentration of the analyte.

4. What are some common types of titrations?

There are several types of titrations commonly used in chemistry, including acid-base titrations, redox titrations, and complexometric titrations. Acid-base titrations involve the reaction of an acid and a base to determine the concentration of an acid or base in a solution. Redox titrations involve the transfer of electrons between two substances, while complexometric titrations involve the formation of a complex compound between a metal ion and a ligand.

5. What are some potential sources of error in titration?

Some potential sources of error in titration include inaccurate measurement of volumes, errors in the concentration of the titrant, and incomplete reactions. Contamination of the solutions can also lead to inaccurate results. It is important to carefully follow the procedure and use accurate equipment to minimize these sources of error.

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