1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

On superconductors and magnets

  1. Mar 23, 2007 #1
    source:British physics olymp. 1995:cool:
    a small slab of material is placed on a dish containing liquid nitrogen.The material is a superconductor at the temperature of liquid nitrogen.A small but strong magnet is moved near and placed over the slab.The magnet is seen to wobble but remains suspended over the slab.
    :smile: describe the motion of the magnet qualitatively(if possible derive an equation of motion by assuming standard constants like temperature,mass,gravity etc.)
    :smile: suggest the reason for the wobbling motion of the magnet.
    o:) Can anyone suggest me links on the web for:
    1. national phy. olymp. papers of different countries?
    2.study matter on the concepts and the application method in context of the above problem?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 23, 2007 #2

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superconductor

    The first picture in the article addresses the magnet levitation situation you are asking about. You can also follow the links at the end of the article for more information. Welcome to the PF, _anant.
     
  4. Mar 23, 2007 #3
    :rolleyes: thanks for providing that link.But really i need help in making out the equations of the motion of the magnet so as to visualize its motion.:cry:
     
  5. Mar 23, 2007 #4
    what other common physics problem could you connect to wobbling?
     
  6. Mar 24, 2007 #5
    :surprised
    in order to give define the rate and concentrations of reactants and products at given time we need to define a rate law
    similarly motion has to be analyzed in terms of differential equations in order to describe any type of motion.:tongue:
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: On superconductors and magnets
Loading...