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One equation for three interactions->

  1. Jan 17, 2004 #1
    In most general sense the Archimedes' law of lever could be writen this way:

    [tex]\frac{F_1}{F_2}=\frac{GM_1+kQ_1}{GM_2-kQ_2}=\frac{D_2}{D_1}[/tex]
    -------------------------------------------------
    F=force
    Q=charge
    M=mass
    D=equi.distance
    G and k are some proportionales

    Consequentially
    -------------------------------------------------
    [tex]\frac{F_1}{D_2}=\frac{F_2}{D_1}=\sqrt{\frac{G^2M_1M_2}{D_1D_2}-\frac{k^2Q_1Q_2}{D_1D_2}+kG\frac{M_2Q_1-M_1Q_2}{D_1D_2}}[/tex]

    Try this equation for this three cases:
    1)[tex]Q_1=Q_2=0[/tex]
    2)[tex]M_1=M_2=0[/tex]
    3)[tex]M_1=Q_2=0[/tex]
    and tell me what they mean!

    No matter how right my physics is it will not see day light.
    That makes me really blue.:frown:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 18, 2004 #2
    well come on...*...any body got some thing to post?
     
  4. Jan 18, 2004 #3
    Moment of Force?

    Aren't you just stating the moments of forces?

    One of your case leads to Newton's law of universal gravitation.

    another leads to Coulomb's law of static electricity.

    I am still figuring out the third case.
     
  5. Jan 18, 2004 #4
    Square of Force

    After further analyses, these are what I think your formulations are:

    You are claiming that there exist in the physical laws of nature, a square of force, that is proportional to the product of two different masses or the product of two different electric charges.

    F^2=Gm1m2 and/or F^2=kq1q2

    In my research I came across [tex]F^2[/tex]. But I could not understand what it means. Now with your ideas, I will try them to see if they will help me explain the [tex]F^2[/tex] in my research. Thanks.
     
  6. Jan 18, 2004 #5
    Re: Square of Force

    first in the 1st case
    F1F2=G2M1M2
    not as you wrote F^2=Gm1m2.
    it's because:
    F1=GM1
    and
    F2=GM2
     
  7. Jan 18, 2004 #6
    G Squared?

    Is G^2 the square of the gravitational constant?
    square of 6.67x10^(-8) dyne cm^2/gm^2?
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2004
  8. Jan 18, 2004 #7
    Re: G Squared?

    It's simply a force-mass ratio.
    Some N over some kg.
     
  9. Jan 18, 2004 #8
    Can We Find This Ratio?

    Can we do an experiment to find this ratio of force over mass?
     
  10. Jan 19, 2004 #9
    probably...
    yes.

    but any way its actual size doesn't really matter as long as you keep it same for every force-mass pair in the closed system.
     
  11. Jan 19, 2004 #10
    Thanks. Now I can sleep peacefully.
     
  12. Jan 26, 2004 #11
    dedaNoe,

    Can you take a look at Antonio's thread "Is Simultaneity an Illusion?" page two?

    Your force/mass ratio might be what I need, and am having trouble with.

    thanks!

    LPF
     
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