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Courses Online Physics Course

  1. Dec 18, 2011 #1
    Is there any online physics course that one can take and also give one a diploma for Bachelor of Science in Physics? Is there such a thing. What is the best online school for this that is recognized by the physics community?
     
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  3. Dec 18, 2011 #2

    e.bar.goum

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    It would depend on your country.

    However, I would be wary of online physics degrees, I think a lot of the worth of a physics degree is in having access to the infrastructure of a university (accelerators, lasers etc) - you need a good experimental grounding. I imagine that a lot of the physics community would think similarly.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Dec 18, 2011 #3
    I have already finished Communications Engineering a decade ago. I just need a Physics Degree and I can't go back to university again (because I have reached limits of eligibility). So I wonder what online course is the best and has the best credibility. Also for BS (Bachelor of Science) in Physics. One doesn't need or require to have access to accelerators like the LHC.
     
  5. Dec 18, 2011 #4

    e.bar.goum

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    No, one doesn't need to have access to accelerators like the LHC, but I got to use a heavy ion linear accelerator at my undergrad institution, in an undergraduate course.

    But that wasn't my point, in my opinion, one does need and require access to experimental facilities, which may include accelerators, or lasers, or vacuum tubes, or Cs cells, etc etc etc to get a good BSc in physics.

    Do you need the certification? I can't advise you without knowing your country, but if you don't, the MIT open courses are excellent resources.

    ETA: I'm not quite sure why you can't just go back to university, if you already have an engineering degree.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2011
  6. Dec 18, 2011 #5
    In my country the Philippines. Our universities don't have any accelerators, lasers, even vacuum tubes. We only have test tubes and some horseshoe magnets in the lab to demonstrate the generation of electricity. That is the best we have.

    What do you mean by certification? I live in the Philippines. I want to enroll in a reliable online course in the USA and get a diploma so I can submit articles at arxiv with the title "BS in Physics" as it is a requirement for any submission as well as to get a general title of "BS in Physics" when writing books for example, etc. to get more credibility.

    Because to go back to college. One needs a certain high GPA (Grade Point Average) that I'm short of.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2011
  7. Dec 18, 2011 #6
    So no one here has taken any online physics course or heard of one that took it?
     
  8. Dec 18, 2011 #7

    eri

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    No, I don't know of any online physics courses that would be considered reputable. You don't need a bachelors in physics to submit to arXiv; you need an academic email address or someone to sponsor you. If you're doing good work, you can find a sponsor. Having a BS in physics doesn't mean you know how to do original research, so that doesn't really qualify you for anything, and doesn't gain you any credibility with journals or publishing companies. A PhD, maybe, but it will still depend on the work itself.
     
  9. Dec 19, 2011 #8
    But to see doing good work, require one to be a physicist first.. if not.. how do you attract those physicists to sponsor you.. Also does sponsoring means finding someone who has posted at arxiv and convincing him to sponsor you.. meaning to make you post too. Is that it? Or does sponsor means an institution or a person and can it be anyone who post at arxiv?
     
  10. Dec 19, 2011 #9

    eri

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    Having a bachelors degree in physics doesn't make you a physicist. It just means you know the basics. If you want to be a physicist, you'd need to earn a PhD, and then you'd have some sort of academic affiliation and can submit papers on your own to arXiv - which isn't a journal. It's just a website. Anyone can submit papers to journals, even without a degree of any sort. It doesn't mean it will be accepted, but anyone can submit.
     
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