Optics: Designing a coating to enhance detection efficiency

In summary, for enhancing the detection efficiency of a silicon detector at a wavelength of 351nm, an antireflection coating should be used with a higher index material such as Yttrium Oxide. The prescription for the coating for both normal and 45 degree incident light at 351nm includes three layers of Yttrium Oxide and Silicon Monoxide, with varying thicknesses. To make the coating effective for a wider range of wavelengths, a combination of different materials and adjustments in layer thickness can be used.
  • #1
liesandcake
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Homework Statement


You are to design a coating to enhance the detection efficiency of a silicon detector (n=3.42 at [tex]\lambda[/tex]=351nm)
(a) Is the coating a reflection or antireflection coating?
(b) Should you use a higher or lower index material for the coating? Specify a material to use.
(c) Provide a prescription for the coating you chose for normal incident light at 351nm.
(d) Provide a prescription for the coating you chose for a 45 degree incident light at 351nm.
(e) How would you make the coating more effective for a wider range of wavelengths?

Homework Equations


[tex]e =\frac{\gamma _{rec}}{\gamma _{inc}}[/tex]
[tex]\lambda_\theta = \frac{\lambda_o}{n}\sqrt{n^2 - \sin{\theta}^2}[/tex]
[tex]n_1 t_1 = \frac{\lambda}{4}[/tex]

The Attempt at a Solution


  • I'm having trouble deciding what material to use, and which equations will allow me to specify a narrow bandpass at [tex]\lambda = 351nm[/tex].
  • So far I have defined "enhance the detection efficiency" as the number of recorded rays divided by the number of incident rays. AKA the amount of incoming rays which are actually absorbed by the detector.
  • From my textbook I have deciphered that it is better to use three layers at thickness [tex]\mbox{$\frac{\lambda}{4}$}[/tex] to ensure that there is reflection
  • I also believe I want an index of refraction somewhere around the square root of the index of the detector, which would be [tex]\sqrt{3.42} = 1.85[/tex]. I'm unsure if this applies to all layers, or if the index needs to vary. I read that it is good to have a high-index material (~3) matched with a low index material (~1.7) to create the most narrow passband.
  • I have found Yttrium Oxide and Silicon Monoxide which I believe have appropriate indices of refraction (n=1.85 and 1.86, respectively) but I have no idea how they would be combined to only allow one wavelength through.
  • I think my main issue is that I lack a core understanding of how these thin films work, and a convenient equation that relates the indices/thicknesses to wavelengths so I can see a nice passband.
 
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  • #2
(a) The coating is an antireflection coating.(b) A higher index material should be used for the coating. A suitable material to use could be Yttrium Oxide (n=1.85).(c) The prescription for the coating for normal incident light at 351nm is as follows: Layer 1: Yttrium Oxide, n=1.85, t=87.75nmLayer 2: Silicon Monoxide, n=1.86, t=87.75nmLayer 3: Yttrium Oxide, n=1.85, t=87.75nm(d) The prescription for the coating for 45 degree incident light at 351nm is as follows: Layer 1: Yttrium Oxide, n=1.85, t=127.41nmLayer 2: Silicon Monoxide, n=1.86, t=127.41nmLayer 3: Yttrium Oxide, n=1.85, t=127.41nm(e) To make the coating more effective for a wider range of wavelengths, one could use a combination of different materials with different indices of refraction, as well as adding additional layers, in order to create a passband that is wide enough to allow multiple wavelengths through. Additionally, one could adjust the thickness of each layer in order to fine tune the passband.
 

Related to Optics: Designing a coating to enhance detection efficiency

What is the purpose of designing a coating to enhance detection efficiency?

The purpose is to increase the amount of light that is detected by a device, such as a photodetector. This allows for higher sensitivity and more accurate measurements.

How does a coating enhance detection efficiency?

A coating can enhance detection efficiency by increasing the reflectivity or transmittance of light, reducing losses due to absorption, and minimizing light scattering. This results in more photons reaching the detector, leading to higher detection efficiency.

What factors should be considered when designing a coating for detection efficiency?

Factors such as the type of material being coated, the wavelength of light being detected, the angle of incidence, and the desired level of enhancement should all be considered. The coating materials and thickness must also be carefully chosen to achieve the desired enhancement.

Can a coating be designed to enhance detection efficiency for all wavelengths?

No, the optimal coating design for enhancing detection efficiency will vary depending on the wavelength of light being detected. Different materials and thicknesses may be needed to achieve the desired enhancement for different wavelengths.

Are there any limitations to designing a coating for detection efficiency?

Yes, there may be limitations such as the availability of suitable coating materials, cost, and practical considerations such as the size and shape of the device being coated. Additionally, the coating may only be effective for a specific range of wavelengths and may not work well for other types of light or radiation.

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