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Orbiting Time Dilation

  1. Jul 23, 2008 #1
    Two ships orbit a planet in opposite directions. Each time they pass each other who is younger?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 23, 2008 #2

    Mentz114

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    Is the planet rotating ? If so, how are the orbits aligned wrt to the poles ?
     
  4. Jul 23, 2008 #3
    The planet is not rotating.
     
  5. Jul 23, 2008 #4

    George Jones

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    Assuming the planet is in inertial frame, equal times elapse on the ships between meetings.
     
  6. Jul 23, 2008 #5
    Doesn't special relativity predict time dilation between the two ships since there is a relative velocity between them?
     
  7. Jul 23, 2008 #6

    George Jones

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    No,; this a common misconception.
     
  8. Jul 23, 2008 #7

    Mentz114

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    They may see each others clocks running differently, but the ageing, or elapsed time will be the same for both when they meet.
     
  9. Jul 24, 2008 #8
    So then, when does and when does not relativity apply?
     
  10. Jul 24, 2008 #9
    What do they see?
     
  11. Jul 24, 2008 #10

    Mentz114

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    That is a difficult question to answer. I've worked out the time-dilation between radially separated observers here -

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=244511

    I'll try and do the sums for orbiting observers at some time. Watch this space.

    M
     
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