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Orders of diffraction

  1. Mar 15, 2014 #1
    Can diffraction be explained for tilted light arrays or only normal incident lights can have diffraction orders?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 15, 2014 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    All light diffracts when it's path is restricted - so you can have diffraction when the light is not normal incidence on the diffraction grating. The reason you are taught the normal-incidence case is that the math is simpler.

    You can try it out and see.
     
  4. Mar 15, 2014 #3

    jtbell

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    Diffraction from what? What is the light shining onto? What kind of diffraction are we talking about here?
     
  5. Mar 15, 2014 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    Diffracted from "tilted light arrays" ... English is a second language perhaps? The interpretation is reinforced by the reference to the angle of incidence and a perusal of introductory lessons in diffraction. We would say "diffraction gratings" in the same place.

    Still - that is a guess: I could be wrong :)
     
  6. Mar 15, 2014 #5

    jtbell

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    This thread was originally in the "Atomic, Solid State, etc." forum, so my first thought was Bragg diffraction of X-rays from a crystal. But that confused me, because with Bragg diffraction you usually do analyze it with the light coming in at an angle!

    Another mentor moved it here later.
     
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