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Origins of our universe

  1. Sep 23, 2009 #1
    is it possible that our universe was created via a black hole? ... could this be possible since black holes act as a vacuum which sucks matter into another dimension or universe? hence a black hole could have created our own universe?

    Another this is what is dark matter?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 23, 2009 #2
  4. Sep 23, 2009 #3
  5. Sep 23, 2009 #4
    what is our universe expanding into?

    if we could travel to the edge of our universe and maintain the same speed as it is expanding what would we see? would we be able to see what we are expanding into?

    are we expanding into NOTHING? something that has no mass and no energy? if so how can something expand into nothing?
     
  6. Sep 24, 2009 #5
    look up 'white hole'.

    what is the universe expanding into? what exists between the individual quata of space?
     
  7. Sep 24, 2009 #6
    There is a theory that the universe continually recycles itself, that is to say it will continue to expand to a certain extent and then will contract on itself and compres into nothingness. We should also realize that if the Universe is truly infinite, there can then be an infinite number of "smaller universes" within the overall Universe. Each smaller universe reacting within itself.
     
  8. Sep 25, 2009 #7
    as the earth spins we are warping space and time, can we warp space enough in which we fall into it?
     
  9. Apr 18, 2011 #8
    Your question " if we were at the edge of the universe what would we see?" actually provides logic that the universe cannot be expanding because in order to expand there has to be a beginng. The universe is infinite which by definition can not have a beginning. Infinitcy has no end but if its infinite there can not be a beginning because where there is a beginning there is an end and where there is an end there is a beginning. To explain exactly what the universe is you would have to be completely open to ideas that seem far out in a higher magnitude to the very ideas that Einstein proposed and Steven Hawkings prosposed.
     
  10. Apr 18, 2011 #9

    bcrowell

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    FAQ: What about the edge of the universe?

    Standard cosmological models do not have edges. They come in two flavors, open and closed. The open type has negative spatial curvature and infinite volume. The closed one has positive curvature and finite volume; spatially, it is the three-dimensional analog of a sphere. Neither has an edge. The open type has no edges because it extends to infinite distances. The closed type has no edges because it wraps around on itself. Current observations of the cosmic microwave background's anisotropy show that our universe is very nearly spatially flat (on the cosmological scale). If it is exactly flat, then it is a special case lying between the more general open and closed cases. The flat case has infinite volume and no edges.

    Sometimes people use the word "universe" when they really mean "observable universe." The observable universe does have an edge, which simply lies at the maximum distance from the observer that light would have been able to travel since the universe became transparent shortly after the Big Bang. We are at the center of our observable universe, and its edges are expanding outward as time goes on, because in the future light will have had more time to travel to us. An observer billions of light years away from us is at the center of their observable universe, which has different edges than ours. All of these edges are boundaries of the availability of information, not places where anything physically special happens.
     
  11. Apr 18, 2011 #10

    bcrowell

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    This is incorrect. There are cosmological models that expand without having a beginning, although current observations show we don't live in a universe like that.

    We don't know whether the universe is spatially infinite; see the FAQ below. All current, realistic cosmological models begin with a Big Bang singularity. This includes both the spatially finite ones and the spatially infinite ones.

    All current, realistic cosmological models have a Big Bang singularity at the beginning, but they do not end in a singularity.

    If you'd like to learn a little about general relativity, the book I always suggest to beginners is Relativity Simply Explained, by Martin Gardner.

    FAQ: Is the universe finite, or is it infinite?

    Standard cosmological models come in two flavors, open and closed. The open type has negative spatial curvature and infinite spatial volume. The closed one has positive curvature and finite spatial volume; spatially, it is the three-dimensional analog of a sphere. Since both types are mathematically self-consistent solutions to the Einstein field equations, the finiteness or infiniteness of the universe is something that cannot be determined by solely logic but only by observation.

    Current observations of the cosmic microwave background's anisotropy show that our universe is very nearly spatially flat (on the cosmological scale). If it is exactly flat, then it is a special case lying between the more general open and closed cases. The flat case has infinite volume. However, the range of uncertainty in the curvature is wide enough to be consistent with either positive or negative curvature, so right now the finiteness or infiniteness of the universe is an open question.

    Sometimes people use the word "universe" when they really mean "observable universe." The observable universe is finite in volume because light has only had a finite time to travel since the Big Bang.
     
  12. Apr 19, 2011 #11
    I would agree with you if i agreed with the current models of what the universe is. Fact of the matter is "for me", they dont make sense. Not in the sense I dont understand them but in the sense I dont understand how they make sense. If that makes sense lol. You said that the "observable universe is finite" because the light only has traveled since the big bang. However.. i cant wrap my head around that because what if we were to move faster than the expansion of the big bang? eventually that light will disappear. What happened to the Observable universe? What would we be traveling through then? That is a question the Big Bang, Singularity or whatever cannot answer. And infinite means without end... how can it be infinite if it has a point where it stops? I believe the universe is made of three particles that break down the natural state of the universe "gravity, black holes" and forms matter once broken down and constantly attempts to build back up through a complicated process. All broken down energy is pulled towards the natural state, thus why gravity pulls. Light, radiation, heat, are all different intensity waves emitted by this process. The particles are infinitely small and build up creating large forms of the particles because of the broken down energy. The particles are infinitely small and the universe is inifinite in time and space allowing for the particles to build up infinitely creating larger and larger forms of the process... atoms... solar systems... galaxies... and the unknown. That is just my beginners opinion of what the universe really.
     
  13. Apr 19, 2011 #12
    The set of all positive integers is infinite, but it clearly has a beginning.

    You have a lot of other errors, but address that error first.
     
  14. Apr 19, 2011 #13
    Im not a mathematician lol but I think you said that numbers basically start from zero and go infinitely? is that what you meant or....
     
  15. Apr 19, 2011 #14

    DaveC426913

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    Sure. Address that.

    There is a difference between 'this is illogical' and 'this does not make sense to me'. Virtually all of your statements so far fall into the latter.

    I am not sure why you would profess to have an opinion while at the same time acknowledging that you don't know enough about it to understand it. Wouldn't it be better to pose questions rather than make statements you know you don't have the background to make? Especially if you're ostensibly trying to help someone else answer their own questions?

    How will you do that? How will you travel faster than the speed limit of the universe? You literally can't get there from here.

    Why do you keep using the word infinite? You should stop using it.


    There are lots of places where personal beliefs and theories can be discussed. PF is not one of them. It violates PF rules (and as such, will be removed).

    If there's something that doesn't make sense to you, ask. We're happy to educate.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2011
  16. Apr 19, 2011 #15
    Im not trying to agitate you but Im not posing facts nor is any other individual who posts on this web site including you. Physics is more perspective than fact because there is more than one way to expalnin any one problem. So when i say I BELIEVE i am expressing what i believe... a point of view just like wikipedia or any other website that claims to have the facts... and you cant CONVERSATE about the origins of the universe without using the Term INFINITE. Friendly conversation or debate would be nice instead of immature responses by the "educators".
     
  17. Apr 19, 2011 #16
    Ok so if standard cosmology models agree on an increasingly expanding universe but there was a time pre inflation, a finite time ago, and the universe expanded at a finite rate then is it even possible for space to be flat and infinite? Unless the edges of the universe, far beyond the observable universe were expanding at an infinite rate? How can the sum of two finite variables equal an infinite amount?

    DaveC I have read many of your posts and would be interested in your opionion also.
     
  18. Apr 19, 2011 #17
    This is possibly the most incorrect thing I've read all week. Perhaps you're confusing physics and philosophy? They both start with a ph...
     
  19. Apr 19, 2011 #18

    DaveC426913

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    We are posting the understanding of cosmology as it is currently understood by science.


    There are accepted models and there are unaccepted models. PF is about accepted models.


    This is not wikipedia. There are places where people are welcome to share their beliefs. Here, the rules (which you agreed to) require that you adhere to currently-accepted theories.

    Use it if you use it correctly.

    I am not an educator, I have no more right here than you. Nor is pointing out the rules immature ("I do not sink zat word means what you sink it means"). It's my duty to do so.

    I do not wish to chase you away by seeming shirty, but PF has a very clear mandate to uphold currently accepted models and is quite diligent in sticking to it. That's why it has 250,000 members.

    Unfortunately, you will have to learn that you do you not have to right to voice any opinion you want here. I hope you enjoy it anyway.
     
  20. Apr 19, 2011 #19
    there is also the theory of the multiverse, where our universe is not the only universe in the whole scheme of things, yet there are lots of universe expanding into space but are infinatly far apart from other universes
     
  21. Apr 19, 2011 #20

    DaveC426913

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    It is better classified as a conjecture. There is no evidence of any multiverse, nor any reason other than conjecture to think there might be one, and there is no conceivable tests to gain any evidence one way or 'tother. I don't even think it counts as a hypothesis. But definitely not a theory.
     
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