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Oscillator circuits

  1. Feb 10, 2009 #1
    One application of an opamp can clearly be seen from a set of speakers for instance, but what about an oscillator circuit?

    What would be a good, clear, example of an application of an oscillator?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 10, 2009 #2

    Averagesupernova

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    This makes no sense. How is it that an opamp is directly related to speakers? I assume you are implying some sort of direct/close relationship.
     
  4. Feb 10, 2009 #3

    es1

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    Anything that wants to keep time. So a wristwatch would be an example. The list is probably endless.
     
  5. Feb 10, 2009 #4

    Gokul43201

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    I'm not sure what you mean by the first part of your post, but the question that follows can be answered independently.
    An oscillator can be used anywhere you need an ac excitation, such as in function generators and ac ohm-meters.
     
  6. Feb 10, 2009 #5
    dalarev, what would you use to find the find the frequency response of an amplifier? Suppose you had an oscillator that you could sweep from below the lowest frequency to above the highest frequency of interest and you measured the output of the amp vs. frequency.
     
  7. Feb 10, 2009 #6
    I was referring to the most basic of all opamps, even before you can consider it as an IC. That's the level my Microelectronics class is at right now, and probably because of my inexperience, I figured an audio amplifier is at least a direct application of something like a voltage amplifier.

    I ask about oscillators then, because it is part of some outside work, and the only thing I can say about an oscillator at this time is that something happens when the gain-with-feedback = 1, and that it will only oscillate at the frequencies for which the phase of the feedback is zero.
     
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