Oscilloscope recommendation?

In summary, a digital oscilloscope is more flexible and has an interface to upload waveforms to a PC for documentation and analysis.
  • #1
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Hello- I'd like to do some basic demonstrations of sound waveforms on the undergrad/AP level using an oscilloscope, and wanted to know what specific recommendations you experts have about microphones, specific connections to the device, which probes to get, and also any comments about this particular oscilloscope:

http://www.grainger.com/product/B-K-PRECISION-Digital-Oscilloscope-14K233?s_pp=false&picUrl=//static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/14K233_AS01?$smthumb$ [Broken]

I've never worked with a digital scope before and it's been many years since I've used an analog one, so some basic suggestions would be much appreciated! With thanks!
 
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  • #2
txphy said:
Hello- I'd like to do some basic demonstrations of sound waveforms on the undergrad/AP level using an oscilloscope, and wanted to know what specific recommendations you experts have about microphones, specific connections to the device, which probes to get, and also any comments about this particular oscilloscope:

http://www.grainger.com/product/B-K-PRECISION-Digital-Oscilloscope-14K233?s_pp=false&picUrl=//static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/14K233_AS01?$smthumb$ [Broken]

I've never worked with a digital scope before and it's been many years since I've used an analog one, so some basic suggestions would be much appreciated! With thanks!

Welcome to the PF.

If you are mainly interested in audio at the moment, you should be able to just use an inexpensive USB-based oscilloscope with your PC/laptop. You don't need a 40MHz 'scope to work with audio. It may be best to start small/inexpensive with the microphone and a USB 'scope, IMO. Then as you start thinking about other projects (digital logic, etc.), you can look at buying a full-size 'scope.

EDIT -- here are some images of USB-based oscilloscopes: https://www.google.com/search?hl=en...msedr...0...1ac.1.60.img..0.8.409.5sBea3JYO6I

:-)
 
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  • #3
berkeman said:
If you are mainly interested in audio at the moment, you should be able to just use an inexpensive USB-based oscilloscope with your PC/laptop.
Hey berkeman. I've had this Winscope program that uses your computers microphone input for years. It was first designed for Win 95 :olduhh: but works fine on my Dell w/ Windows 7; Go figure.
 
  • #4
Perfect!
 
  • #5
The computer based options are neat, but I'm in a position now where I can purchase a dedicated oscilloscope, and the funds will be gone soon, so here's my one chance. I can get either a B&K digital one or an Instek analog one from my approved vendors, as below:

http://www.grainger.com/product/B-K-PRECISION-Digital-Oscilloscope-14K233?s_pp=false&picUrl=//static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/14K233_AS01?$smthumb$ [Broken]http://www.fishersci.com/ecomm/servlet/itemdetail?storeId=10652&langId=-1&catalogId=29104&productId=2079745&distype=0&highlightProductsItemsFlag=Y&fromSearch=1&searchType=PROD&hasPromo=0

Thoughts? Thanks!
 
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  • #7
txphy said:
I can get either a B&K digital one or an Instek analog one

I would recommend that you get a digital one. They are much more flexible, and probably have an interface to upload waveforms to a PC for documentation and analysis.
 
  • #8
Absolutely buy a digital scope. Period. End of discussion. You can save waveforms, transfer them to pc, control from pc, all kinds of good things. If the B&K is the only choice, then go for it, but it may not be the most featured for the money.
 

1. What is an oscilloscope and what is it used for?

An oscilloscope is a scientific instrument used to measure and display electrical waveforms. It can be used to analyze and troubleshoot electronic circuits, as well as measure various electrical parameters such as voltage, frequency, and phase.

2. What factors should I consider when choosing an oscilloscope?

There are several factors to consider when choosing an oscilloscope, including bandwidth, sampling rate, number of channels, and display features. It is also important to consider your specific measurement needs and budget.

3. What is the difference between analog and digital oscilloscopes?

Analog oscilloscopes use a cathode ray tube (CRT) to display waveforms, while digital oscilloscopes use a digital display. Digital oscilloscopes also offer more advanced features and measurements, but analog oscilloscopes are often less expensive.

4. What is the importance of bandwidth in an oscilloscope?

Bandwidth refers to the range of frequencies an oscilloscope can accurately measure. It is an important factor to consider depending on the types of signals you will be measuring. A higher bandwidth oscilloscope is needed for high-frequency signals.

5. Can I use a computer as an oscilloscope?

Yes, there are software programs and USB oscilloscope devices that allow you to use your computer as an oscilloscope. However, these may not have the same accuracy and features as a standalone oscilloscope. It is important to research and compare options before making a decision.

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