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Our future in our own hand

  1. Apr 3, 2005 #1
    Climate change has become a reality and is mainly due to the anthropogenic changes. When we talk about climate change its what actually happened during last 150 years to the Earth climate after human industrial revolution. Although the major contibution to these human induced changes goes to devloped countries but the impact of this change will be more severe for developing countries which have very insignificant contibution to the increasing greenhouse gases concentration because they are not better equipped to cope with the adverse effects.
    Climate itself is the most difficult physical problem because of almost infinite degrees of freedom. Its only after the availability of super computers that we are able to look at this problem. Anyway, its just a start and at the moment , there are great uncertanities. Only time and availability of better computers can help in future.
    Anyway, its a time to at least understand the causes of this climate change and its adverse effects. Our future is in our own hand....
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 3, 2005 #2

    Danger

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    Not to take this lightly, but... Speaking as one who was getting snowed on yesterday, I say 'bring on the global warming, and the sooner the better!' :approve:
     
  4. Apr 3, 2005 #3
    Okay neighbour, because everyone may be heading north.
     
  5. Apr 3, 2005 #4

    Danger

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    Since you spelled 'neighbour' correctly... welcome aboard. :biggrin:
     
  6. Apr 5, 2005 #5
    The future of the climate is not merely in our own hands.

    What caused the ice ages? What thawed them out?
    It was NOT industrial emissions.

    Oh, and don't fall into the trap of thinking a better computer
    model will save us. Even a great model can give junk results
    if there is a buildup of inaccuracy (numerical entropy). And
    most of today's models are gross oversimplifications of the
    climate that couldn't predict the weather for a week let alone
    the climate for a century.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2005
  7. Apr 5, 2005 #6

    Pengwuino

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    *looks at the weather page* Pff... a week... get real :P
     
  8. Apr 5, 2005 #7

    russ_watters

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    Um, you're not allowed to say that. Alberta needs to stay exactly the way it is, even if I only get there to ski once a decade or so.
     
  9. Apr 5, 2005 #8

    Danger

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    I couldn't possibly care less what happens at Banff or Louise; I'm in the foothills. (And before some smart-ass (Evo?) pipes up on that, I'm referring to the terrain, not the hospital...)
     
  10. Apr 5, 2005 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    A few short and long term strategies:

    0). Quit arguing about if, and start planning for the inevitable

    1). Stop making so many babies; esp third world nations. No more than 2 children per family, preferably less.

    2). Don't build homes on flood plains; esp near rivers and beaches.

    3). Alternative fuels and energy - Go Hydrogen!

    4). Destroy every SUV and whip the owners :biggrin:

    5). Better flood control systems

    6). Investigate alternative and higher yield crops for farming.

    7). Plan for population shifts

    8). Develop better and safer pesticides - we're gonna need em.

    9). Continue to improve and perfect emergency/disaster relief services.

    10). Always have a one month supply of food, and a week's worth of water on hand.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2005
  11. Apr 5, 2005 #10

    Moonbear

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    I have to admit, I've NEVER seen anyone start a list with 0 before. :biggrin:


    Hey! I'm waiting for the polar ice caps to melt so I'll have that nice beachfront property in the tropics I've always dreamt about. :biggrin: :rofl:
     
  12. Apr 5, 2005 #11

    Ivan Seeking

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    Part of my job involves programming - everything starts with zero. :biggrin:

    http://globalchange.gov/
     
  13. Apr 5, 2005 #12
    Won't the melting of icebergs add more water to the sea? And therefore leading to more absorption of C02 emmissions i.e. the problem takes care of itself?

    Actually, come to think about it..probably not.. :frown:
     
  14. Apr 5, 2005 #13

    Ivan Seeking

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    Feedback is known to exist. It's not a matter of if, but how much, and how fast. Note also that global warming and the runaway greenhouse question are two completely separate issues.
     
  15. Apr 5, 2005 #14
    Aren't 90% of icebergs underwater? Since ice takes up more space than liquid, then wouldn't the melting almost be even to what we have now?
     
  16. Apr 5, 2005 #15

    Ivan Seeking

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    I think your question assumes that the entire Arctic ice mass is floating on water.
     
  17. Apr 5, 2005 #16

    Danger

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    You've forgotten the Zeroeth Law of Robotics? Fie on you! :tongue:
     
  18. Apr 5, 2005 #17

    Moonbear

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    Nope. Can't forget something I never knew. :tongue:
     
  19. Apr 5, 2005 #18

    Danger

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    I'm sorry. :redface: I never realized what a deprived childhood you had. I suppose it explains your depraved adulthood, though.
     
  20. Apr 5, 2005 #19
    Ice ages have occurred repeatedly in the history of the planet, and there are many triggers, such as salinization of the oceans, how that affects the currents, and how that affects the climate. Even doubters must admit to the likelihood of history repeating (as Ivan says, the inevitable). The question is when/how fast. Those who question whether human impact (industrialism, use of fossil fuels, etc.) may be causing the change to occur, and more quickly, are in denial.
     
  21. Apr 10, 2005 #20
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    Well its a fact that climate change is occuring even before the birth of human being on the planet due to natural forcings but the time scale of such climate change is too large to be taken into account and its not the matter of survival of the planet at least its the matter of survival of human being on the planet. See the change in the temperature of the earth during last 150 years, the time scale of such a change is very small so it is something which is alarming and must be taken into account. One cant stop the natural forcings to occur but one can think of strategies not to accelrate this natural climate change process due to anthropogenic forcings. He who thinks that the planet has passed through many ice ages must understand that there has been no ice age after the birth of human being!
     
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