Oxygen forms ions with element X

In summary, an unidentified element reacts with oxygen to form an ionic compound with the chemical formula X2O3. Phosphorous is the only element that does not produce a compound.
  • #1
cp255
54
0
A piece of unidentified element X reacts with oxygen to form an ionic compound with the chemical formula X2O3. Which of the following elements is the most likely identity of X?

A) Ba
B) Cs
C) In
D) P
E) Zn

I am doing exam practice questions and I came across this. The correct answer is C. I don't really know why.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I think I figured it out. The charges wouldn't balance with Ba2+, Cs+, or Zn2+, and phosphorous is negative which just leaves In.
 
  • #3
cp255 said:
A piece of unidentified element X reacts with oxygen to form an ionic compound with the chemical formula X2O3. Which of the following elements is the most likely identity of X?

A) Ba
B) Cs
C) In
D) P
E) Zn

I am doing exam practice questions and I came across this. The correct answer is C. I don't really know why.

cp255 said:
I think I figured it out. The charges wouldn't balance with Ba2+, Cs+, or Zn2+, and phosphorous is negative which just leaves In.

C?

I thought well theoretically you can imagine such a molecule as C2O3 (structure like an epoxide) but if it exists it must be pretty obscure (that appears to be the situation) mainly on the basis I haven't heard of it but maybe someone has a better reason. They wouldn't be asking you about it.

It seems to me for the rest the question can have two answers, but In is OK.
 
  • #4
C not as in element, but C as in ABCDE answers given :wink:

I admit to make the same mistake initially.

From what I remember C2O3 was never observed (although several strange carbon oxides, like C3O2, have been made).
 
  • #5
I said there was more than one right answer. However I was thinking of compounds, viz P2O3 but I now see the question specified ions not compounds, so that excludes P2O3 (as well as C2O3 )

I guess when I see X2O3, P comes to my mind much more easily than In.

But then I was quite struck when recently you said
Borek said:
Indium(I) iodide comes to mind.

I was thinking of asking your permission to put it in the 'favorite quotes' thread if you didn't mind. :biggrin:

Or has the chemistry of Indium become more important than it was? (I do know it is used on the touch screen I'm using right now (though not why) and that sources of it are running out.)
 
  • #6
Selection of indium iodide was pretty random, that was just the first compound that come to my mind when I looked at the periodic table.
 

1. What is the process of oxygen forming ions with element X?

When oxygen reacts with element X, it will typically gain or lose electrons to achieve a more stable electron configuration. This results in the formation of ions, with oxygen either becoming a negatively charged anion or a positively charged cation.

2. How does the formation of ions between oxygen and element X occur?

The formation of ions between oxygen and element X occurs through a process called electron transfer. Oxygen has six valence electrons, while element X has a different number of valence electrons. In order to achieve a full outer shell, electrons are transferred between the two elements, resulting in the formation of ions.

3. What are the properties of the ions formed between oxygen and element X?

The properties of the ions formed between oxygen and element X will depend on the specific elements involved. Generally, the ions will have different chemical and physical properties compared to their neutral forms. For example, an oxygen anion will have a negative charge and be more reactive, while an oxygen cation will have a positive charge and be less reactive.

4. What is the significance of oxygen forming ions with element X?

The formation of ions between oxygen and element X has many practical applications in chemistry and biology. For example, this process is important in the formation of ionic compounds, which are used in various industries and in biological processes like nerve signaling. It also plays a role in the Earth's atmosphere, as oxygen ions help maintain the balance of ions in the air.

5. Can oxygen form ions with any element?

Yes, oxygen can potentially form ions with any element, as long as the conditions are right for electron transfer to occur. However, the likelihood and ease of this process will depend on the specific elements involved and their respective electron configurations.

Similar threads

  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
621
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
8K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
6K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
4K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
4K
Back
Top