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Par4 gene cancer

  1. Feb 18, 2008 #1
    Are there any clinical trials or anything like that involving par4 gene and humans to make people more cancer-resistant, do you think it would work to make people cancer-resistant like it does in mice?

    if there was a cancer resistant person do you think their white blood cells would cure cancer in mice like white blood cells from cancer resistant mice cure cancer in mice?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 15, 2008 #2
    Could somebody tell me what par4 stands for (the gene that makes things cancer-resistant) does it stand for Prostate Apoptosis Response-4 or does it stand for Protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR4)- could you let me know where you found out which one it stands for? I read that it can cure cancer/stop cancer from forming, does anyone know if it works for every type? I read that it worked for even aggressive types
     
  4. Sep 15, 2008 #3
    So, par4 doesn't kill all typees of cancer cells, but maybe because it interfers with signaling that promotes tumor growth it could help stop all types of cancers?

    http://www.nyas.org/annals/annalsExtra.asp?annalID=34


    the new york academy of science says

    "Par-4 does not kill all types of cancer cells. In cancer cells that resist Par-4, such as hormone-dependent tumors, there is sufficient PKA to allow phosphorylation to take place, but Par-4 is still kept out of the nucleus, meaning the cell survives."

    Tumors in mice regressed quickly after treatment
    "Par-4 also works in other ways. Previous work showed that Par-4 can suppress tumors by interfering with signaling that promotes tumor growth. In one experiment, when Par-4 was purposely overexpressed in cancer cells, they were prevented from forming colonies in a soft agar medium. In another, tumors were started in mice and allowed to grow. Then the tumors were injected either with Par-4 adenovirus (a viral vector delivery system), or with a control viral vector. After about three weeks, all twenty of the tumors injected with Par-4 shrank markedly, while the other tumors continued to grow apace."

    "The researchers named the region of Par-4 responsible for singling out cancer cells the Selective Apoptosis of Cancer (SAC) domain. The protein is being developed as a potential therapeutic agent against an array of cancers, not just tumors of the prostate. Says Rangnekar, "The best part is that despite the apoptotic effect in cancer cells, neither the SAC domain nor Par-4 induces apoptosis in normal cells—implying that treatment should be non-toxic and safe." Also, the fact that Par-4 targets cancer in different ways provides multiple opportunities for drug development."
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2008
  5. Sep 16, 2008 #4
    sorry I can't edit posts

    I mean does par-4 need to be in the nucleus of the cell to be overexpressed
    because it says this
    "Par-4 does not kill all types of cancer cells. In cancer cells that resist Par-4, such as hormone-dependent tumors, there is sufficient PKA to allow phosphorylation to take place, but Par-4 is still kept out of the nucleus, meaning the cell survives."
    and then it says this

    "Par-4 also works in other ways. Previous work showed that Par-4 can suppress tumors by interfering with signaling that promotes tumor growth. In one experiment, when Par-4 was purposely overexpressed in cancer cells, they were prevented from forming colonies in a soft agar medium. In another, tumors were started in mice and allowed to grow. Then the tumors were injected either with Par-4 adenovirus (a viral vector delivery system), or with a control viral vector. After about three weeks, all twenty of the tumors injected with Par-4 shrank markedly, while the other tumors continued to grow apace."

    when the tumors were injected with the par-4 adenovirus/a control viral vector- did the par4 gene not need to get into the nucleus to work? Maybe par4 doesn't need to get into the nucleus if it interferes with signaling that inhibits tumor growth? Sorry for writing so much, thanks
     
  6. Sep 16, 2008 #5
    My only question is:

    could you force par 4 into the nucleus, with a virus or something, if it's kept out of the nucleus?
    "In cancer cells that resist Par-4, such as hormone-dependent tumors, there is sufficient PKA to allow phosphorylation to take place, but Par-4 is still kept out of the nucleus, meaning the cell survives."
     
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