Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory (Thoughts? I'm not a fan but I'm still reading)

In summary, the conversation is about the structure and content of Griffith's Particle book, specifically the chapter on the wave function. The speaker is concerned about the use of non-integer values for k in the wave function and the fact that the author skips steps and makes the material more complicated. They are seeking opinions and an explanation for their confusion. The conversation ends with Elwin asking why k has to be an integer.
  • #1
Elwin.Martin
207
0
I own a copy of Griffith's Quantum Mechanics and I like how it is written very much but while skimming through Griffith's Particle book I saw a reference that said "at the level of Park" and I decided to investigate.

I started to read through it and the text is structured the way most books are, half on theory and half on more direct applications. An introductory chapter on failures of classical physics and then an introduction to the wave function etc but I don't why Park's wave function chapter contains some of the material it contains.

In his second chapter, section 2.3, he takes what he calls a simple solution of the Schrodinger equation

ψk(x,t)=A(k)ei(kx-ωkt)

and then he takes and integrates with respect to k?

ψ(x,t)=∫A(k)ei(kx-ωkt)dk
So does k take any non integer values? I would think that integrating over just integers would still make more sense as a sum, right?

He uses this A(k)ei(kx-ωkt) format through the chapter and tends to skip a lot of steps mathematically and I'm concerned about missing something simple.

Is this a merit of the book that I'm missing somehow by being weak or is the book just filled with gaps the reader needs to fill in? His whole development of the wave function just strikes me as odd...

Though he includes a brief explanation in the Appendix he just applies Fourier's theorem and states a piece of information about A(k). Is this meant to be easily followed? It seems a bit odd to go through all this trouble for his A(k)...

He then defines a φ(k) and a J in terms of A(k) and it just gets messier and messier...

When I skipped to Chapter 3 I had no problem reading the material but I really dislike the presentation of Chapter 2.

Anyway I was just wondering if I could get more opinions on the book and maybe an explanation for my problem. It's probably just my weak math skills but I still feel like he skips a bit and makes things unnecessarily complicated...

Thoughts?

Elwin
 
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  • #2
Why do you think k has to be an integer?
 

Related to Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory (Thoughts? I'm not a fan but I'm still reading)

1. What is the purpose of "Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory"?

"Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory" serves as an introductory text to the fundamental principles and concepts of quantum theory. It aims to provide a basic understanding of quantum mechanics and its applications in various fields of science.

2. Is "Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory" suitable for beginners?

Yes, "Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory" is designed for beginners and assumes no prior knowledge of quantum mechanics. It uses simple language and examples to explain complex ideas, making it accessible for those new to the subject.

3. What sets "Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory" apart from other quantum theory books?

One notable feature of "Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory" is its emphasis on conceptual understanding rather than mathematical rigor. It presents the key concepts and principles of quantum mechanics in a clear and intuitive manner, making it easier for readers to grasp the ideas.

4. Does "Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory" cover advanced topics?

No, "Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory" is meant to provide a basic understanding of quantum mechanics. It does not cover advanced topics or complex mathematical equations. Instead, it focuses on building a strong foundation of the fundamental principles of quantum theory.

5. Can "Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory" be used as a standalone resource for learning quantum mechanics?

While "Park's Introduction to Quantum Theory" is a comprehensive and well-written book, it is always recommended to use multiple resources when learning a complex subject like quantum mechanics. Other supplementary materials such as lectures, videos, and practice problems can help reinforce the concepts presented in the book.

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