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Partial Pressures

  1. Nov 15, 2013 #1

    Qube

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    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    http://i.minus.com/jbzyIAyMvUrADW.png [Broken]

    2. Relevant equations

    Conservation of mass in a closed system.

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I'm not sure what the lecture is getting at here. Why is it that the number of moles of NO2 added to twice the number of moles of N2O4 = the total moles? Shouldn't it be the other way around?
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
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  3. Nov 15, 2013 #2

    Borek

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    Number of moles of what is calculated?
     
  4. Nov 15, 2013 #3

    Qube

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    I think 0.330 moles refer to the total moles of gas in the flask. I'm not sure why the equivalency on the bottom of the slide holds.
     
  5. Nov 16, 2013 #4

    Borek

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    Have you READ the text you posted? It clearly explains what is calculated.
     
  6. Nov 16, 2013 #5

    Qube

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    I don't understand what I posted
     
  7. Nov 16, 2013 #6

    Borek

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    Do you understand

    ?
     
  8. Nov 16, 2013 #7

    Qube

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    I understand that but nothing else.
     
  9. Nov 16, 2013 #8

    Borek

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    Does the number of moles of N atoms change throughout the reaction?
     
  10. Nov 16, 2013 #9

    Qube

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    No, there are two moles on either side
     
  11. Nov 16, 2013 #10

    Borek

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    OK (although the reason is slightly different - mass is conserved, nitrogen is not produced out of nothing, actually the fact that there are two moles on both sides on of the reaction equation is a conclusion of the mass conservation, not a proof of the mass conservation as you seem to be implying. Also, it doesn't have to be two moles - what if you start with half o mole of nitrogen atoms?).

    There is an identical amount of nitrogen atoms before and after the reaction.

    How many moles of nitrogen atoms per mole of NO2?

    How many moles of nitrogen atoms per mole of N2O4?
     
  12. Nov 16, 2013 #11

    Qube

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    There are n moles of nitrogen atoms per mole of NO2 and 2n moles of nitrogen atoms per mole of N2O4.
     
  13. Nov 17, 2013 #12

    Borek

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    No, not "n moles" per mole. n has a well known value.

    What is a mole definition?
     
  14. Nov 17, 2013 #13

    Qube

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    There is one mole of N in one mole of nitrogen dioxide. And two moles of N in one mole of dinitrogen tetraoxide
     
  15. Nov 17, 2013 #14

    Borek

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    OK, you have a mixture of nNO2 (containing 1 mole of nitrogen atoms per one mole of gas) and nN2O4 (containing 2 moles of nitrogen atoms per one mole of gas). How many moles of nitrogen atoms are in the mixture?
     
  16. Nov 17, 2013 #15

    Qube

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    There are n plus 2n moles of nitrogen.
     
  17. Nov 17, 2013 #16

    Qube

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    More specifically, the first n refers to nitrogen dioxide and the second n refers to dinitrogen tetraoxide.
     
  18. Nov 17, 2013 #17

    Borek

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    OK, so now you know that the mixture contains nNO2+2nN2O4 moles of nitrogen atoms, you know that initially there were 0.330 moles of nitrogen atoms, and you know that amount of nitrogen atoms didn't change. Get back to the original text.
     
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