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Particle detection

  1. May 1, 2013 #1
    hi all, i have done research and know the basic ones but could you guys please list all the methods of particle detection (especialy ones that detect neutrinos) that you know of im learning particle physics and this would really help me.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 1, 2013 #2

    phinds

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    Since you've done some research, how about you list the ones you know so we'll know what to fill in?
     
  4. May 2, 2013 #3
    cherenkov, cloud. And i know of zeus but not how it works yet.
     
  5. May 2, 2013 #4
    i just want a list of names so i can research them. Thanks in advance if anyone complies.
     
  6. May 2, 2013 #5
    and spark, drift and scintilation devices. Its mainly the solid state ones id like listed.
     
  7. May 2, 2013 #6

    jtbell

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  8. May 2, 2013 #7
    arnt there more than those? Ive already looked at the wiki.
     
  9. May 3, 2013 #8
    and mainly, how are neutral particles detected?
     
  10. May 3, 2013 #9

    jtbell

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  11. May 4, 2013 #10
    thanks, any other methods of neutral particle detection aside from cloud chambers?
     
  12. May 4, 2013 #11
    and if neutrinos can pass through millions of km of lead how can we be sure that they will interact with the proton?
     
  13. May 4, 2013 #12

    mfb

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    We cannot be sure. Just a tiny fraction (like 10-15, plus minus some orders of magnitude) of all neutrinos are detected in neutrino detectors. Those detectors need a large volume and large particle fluxes to see anything.
     
  14. May 4, 2013 #13

    jtbell

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    Also, higher-energy neutrinos are more likely to interact (the cross-section increases linearly with energy), so it's easier to study neutrinos produced at an accelerator (10s or 100s of GeV) than solar neutrinos (a few MeV).
     
  15. May 4, 2013 #14
    what acelerator collisions produce neutrinos?
     
  16. May 4, 2013 #15

    jtbell

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    From http://lbne.fnal.gov/neutrino-beam.shtml:

    Following the decay pipe, the beam passes through a lot of solid material (metal, rocks, etc.) that absorbs the other decay products, leaving only the neutrinos.
     
  17. May 4, 2013 #16
    what target is used and what energy protons? I know im nitpicking sorry.
     
  18. May 4, 2013 #17

    jtbell

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    In the setup described above, you want a target that's not too dense, so it doesn't absorb the kaons and pions before they can enter the decay pipe; but you want it to be dense enough to produce a decent number of proton interactions.

    When I was a grad student working with a neutrino experiment there more than 30 years ago, they used an aluminum target. Here's a description of that old setup, from my dissertation:

    I see the current MINOS experiment http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MINOS uses a 120-GeV proton beam and a graphite target.

    attachment.php?attachmentid=58473&stc=1&d=1367686521.gif
     

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    Last edited: May 4, 2013
  19. May 4, 2013 #18
    thank you jtbell.
     
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